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Ditch that Pitch: The Case Against Selling to First-Time Prospects

Ditch that Pitch: The Case Against Selling to First-Time Prospects

You’ve probably come across the ancient sales adage “resist the itch to pitch”, and you’ve most likely felt and gave into this irresistible urge yourself one too many times already. It turns out, there’s sound reason behind the rhyme. Sadly, though, this point gets lost on many sales and marketing folks, inevitably leading to an all-too-familiar outcome: prospects losing interest and going cold.

If someone submits a form on your site, becomes your blog subscriber, downloads your whitepaper, or happens to be a valid entry on a list, do you jump out at that potential prospect with your sales pitch right away?

Of course not. But that’s what most B2B marketers seem to be doing, and here’s why you have to set yourself apart and always start with a thorough understanding of your prospects’ situation before anything else.

#1: Putting yourself in your prospects’ shoes is bad advice

It’s going to take a long and careful process to get leads to that point where they’ll be interested in hearing about your pitch, and the first few steps will involve becoming really familiar with your prospect’s needs and pain points.

Pitching too early means that you probably haven’t done your homework thoroughly enough (and are just relying mostly on guesswork). There’s far too much nuance involved in creating a sales pitch that putting yourself in your prospects’ shoes simply won’t cut it. You have to ask questions first.

Related: The Remedy for Unqualified Leads: Nurture Them Until They’re Ready

#2: You can’t (and shouldn’t) connect the dots with just a single touch point.

It goes without saying that not all leads are created equal. Only some small portion of your new leads (about 15% by some estimates) will actually be ready to face your sales team. Clearly, this means that you’ll be putting off the vast majority of prospects that enter your pipeline by throwing your sales pitch at every new contact you come across with.

It takes two separate points to draw a line and, to paint a fuller picture of your lead, you’re going to need a series of connected touch points, with each one designed to incrementally sharpen your prospect’s profile. This will help you craft a more compelling sales pitch later on and help you decide whether a prospect is qualified enough to hear it.

Check this out:  Multi-Channel Approach & Marketing Automation: Partner for 33% Sales Increase in Sydney IP Services

#3: Taking time to qualify early speeds things up later.

The quality of the leads you work with at the early stages of the sales process is an important factor in determining how long it’s going to take leads to become buyers.

Assess your lead: Is hot, warm or cold? Find out here..

If you’re able to slow things down and thoroughly identify prospects that really have an urgent need, then the time-to-decision is going to be much shorter. Also, by taking this approach, you’re able to reduce the time spent on prospects who’ll never become your customers. This helps you put resources where and when they’re needed the most.

In other words, rushing things and pitching to new prospects right away will actually make the sales process longer than it should be.

Related: CHAMP Methodology: Spot on Sales-Ready Leads with These Questions

#4: Pain doesn’t always equal an urgent need.

Your target buyer’s pain points can be your most important resource–that is, if you can figure them out and have the solution they really need. But sometimes, pain points don’t often make up an urgent need. Urgent needs are what turn your prospects into buyers, so you have to gauge whether the issue your leads face is severe enough to require an urgent solution.

Once again, this means that you have to set your sales pitch aside and focus on knowing what your prospect is really going through. You need to ask probing questions that uncover specific issues in front of your leads and find out whether these make up a real business need or not.

There’s always a right time for delivering your sales pitch, and the early stage of the sales process (when you still have very little idea about your prospect’s situation) is clearly not when this should happen. That’s the time for asking questions, diagnosing pain points, and matching your solution with your prospects’ needs.

Proceed if and only if all these have been checked off. Otherwise, just ditch that pitch.

 

Author Bio:

Ralph is a content writer at Callbox. He closely follows developments in B2B marketing and occasionally looks back on interesting business stories. He enjoys reading, playing the guitar, and spending time with his pet cat.

 

 

Learn more Sales and Telemarketing tips at The Savvy Marketer’s Blog

Love to know how we generate qualified leads?

Get in touch with our Marketing Consultant or Dial +1 888.810.7464  or 310.439.5814

 

 

6 Ways a SMART Telemarketing Platform Doubles Sales Productivity
Going Beyond the 500 Mark: How to Integrate Telemarketing with Other Channels to Gain Massive ROI

Ditch that Pitch: The Case Against Selling to First-Time Prospects

Ditch that Pitch: The Case Against Selling to First-Time Prospects

You’ve probably come across the ancient sales adage “resist the itch to pitch”, and you’ve most likely felt and gave into this irresistible urge yourself one too many times already. It turns out, there’s sound reason behind the rhyme. Sadly, though, this point gets lost on many sales and marketing folks, inevitably leading to an all-too-familiar outcome: prospects losing interest and going cold.

If someone submits a form on your site, becomes your blog subscriber, downloads your whitepaper, or happens to be a valid entry on a list, do you jump out at that potential prospect with your sales pitch right away?

Of course not. But that’s what most B2B marketers seem to be doing, and here’s why you have to set yourself apart and always start with a thorough understanding of your prospects’ situation before anything else.

#1: Putting yourself in your prospects’ shoes is bad advice

It’s going to take a long and careful process to get leads to that point where they’ll be interested in hearing about your pitch, and the first few steps will involve becoming really familiar with your prospect’s needs and pain points.

Pitching too early means that you probably haven’t done your homework thoroughly enough (and are just relying mostly on guesswork). There’s far too much nuance involved in creating a sales pitch that putting yourself in your prospects’ shoes simply won’t cut it. You have to ask questions first.

Related: The Remedy for Unqualified Leads: Nurture Them Until They’re Ready

#2: You can’t (and shouldn’t) connect the dots with just a single touch point.

It goes without saying that not all leads are created equal. Only some small portion of your new leads (about 15% by some estimates) will actually be ready to face your sales team. Clearly, this means that you’ll be putting off the vast majority of prospects that enter your pipeline by throwing your sales pitch at every new contact you come across with.

It takes two separate points to draw a line and, to paint a fuller picture of your lead, you’re going to need a series of connected touch points, with each one designed to incrementally sharpen your prospect’s profile. This will help you craft a more compelling sales pitch later on and help you decide whether a prospect is qualified enough to hear it.

Check this out:  Multi-Channel Approach & Marketing Automation: Partner for 33% Sales Increase in Sydney IP Services

#3: Taking time to qualify early speeds things up later.

The quality of the leads you work with at the early stages of the sales process is an important factor in determining how long it’s going to take leads to become buyers.

Assess your lead: Is hot, warm or cold? Find out here..

If you’re able to slow things down and thoroughly identify prospects that really have an urgent need, then the time-to-decision is going to be much shorter. Also, by taking this approach, you’re able to reduce the time spent on prospects who’ll never become your customers. This helps you put resources where and when they’re needed the most.

In other words, rushing things and pitching to new prospects right away will actually make the sales process longer than it should be.

Related: CHAMP Methodology: Spot on Sales-Ready Leads with These Questions

#4: Pain doesn’t always equal an urgent need.

Your target buyer’s pain points can be your most important resource–that is, if you can figure them out and have the solution they really need. But sometimes, pain points don’t often make up an urgent need. Urgent needs are what turn your prospects into buyers, so you have to gauge whether the issue your leads face is severe enough to require an urgent solution.

Once again, this means that you have to set your sales pitch aside and focus on knowing what your prospect is really going through. You need to ask probing questions that uncover specific issues in front of your leads and find out whether these make up a real business need or not.

There’s always a right time for delivering your sales pitch, and the early stage of the sales process (when you still have very little idea about your prospect’s situation) is clearly not when this should happen. That’s the time for asking questions, diagnosing pain points, and matching your solution with your prospects’ needs.

Proceed if and only if all these have been checked off. Otherwise, just ditch that pitch.

 

Author Bio:

Ralph is a content writer at Callbox. He closely follows developments in B2B marketing and occasionally looks back on interesting business stories. He enjoys reading, playing the guitar, and spending time with his pet cat.

 

 

Learn more Sales and Telemarketing tips at The Savvy Marketer’s Blog

Love to know how we generate qualified leads?

Get in touch with our Marketing Consultant or Dial +1 888.810.7464  or 310.439.5814

 

 

6 Ways a SMART Telemarketing Platform Doubles Sales Productivity
Going Beyond the 500 Mark: How to Integrate Telemarketing with Other Channels to Gain Massive ROI

Be a SMART Marketer, Know the Best Time to Call your Prospects

Be a SMART Marketer, Know the Best Time to Call your Prospects

When is the best time to post on social media?  Maybe between 7 to 9 in the morning before classes and office hours start, 5 pm till late evening, weekends, or just anytime a thought or a moment that deserves a click comes up; regardless of who likes, reacts or shares the post.

In business, you couldn’t care less on your social media posts. According to  The Social Media Hat there are optimum post times for businesses to catch the majority of followers when they are most active. 

Worst Time:

  • Facebook: 8pm – 8am
  • Twitter: 8pm – 9am
  • Google+: 6am – 8am
  • Pinterest: 5pm – 7pm

Best Time:

  • Facebook: 1pm – 4pm
  • Twitter: 1pm – 3pm
  • Google+: 9am – 11am
  • Pinterest: 2pm – 4pm, 8pm – 1am

The social media posting data was probed not solely for users to maximize the peak exposure period but to enable them to reach target followers at a time when they are most active and ready to respond. 

The same tactic works well for marketers in analyzing the best time to call prospects.

We’ve learned so many telemarketing lessons and strategies in the past like to call prospects during Wednesdays and Thursdays between 8-9am and 4-6pm and promptly calling inbound leads within 5 minutes of receipt, but getting hold of a prospects in a phone call at his best time is a prevailing challenge for most telemarketers up to now.

The truth is, these proposed calling time frames may have been proven effective in the previous years, but may now hardly withstand the challenge brought about by the rapid evolution of the digital age that has affected and continue to affect the way people do business.

Related: Inbound and Outbound Strategies is a Match Made in Marketing Heaven

Today, decision makers move and think fast, are aggressive, interactive and adeptly practice technology-based sales scheme from start to finish. This should be a compelling reason for telemarketers to become smarter in analyzing the best time to catch prospects when they are most ready to answer a business call and at the same time, utilize all available tools and resources that would ease the call flow while mitigating call failures like missed appointments, No Answer, several follow-ups and busy signals, SMART Calling is one of the proven tactics.

Here’s a quick walk-through of SMART Calling

SMART Calling is a technology process that is capable of prioritizing sales calls based on a set of rules that can be configured to optimize prospect reachability. Using a weight-based system of different events, filters, KPIs and lead scores, SMART Calling scores target prospects on the  list based on a combination of factors, including:

  • Lead score
  • Recency of the Last Call
  • Times of successful phone contact
  • Times of email opens
  • TImes of email replies
  • Times of website visits

Note that Lead scores are an indication of your prospect’s sales-readiness based on demographic and behavioral scores and an integral part of the prospecting process that will give insight of WHO to pursue first – a process that would hone agents to become SMART marketers. 

Read more: SMART Calling: What’s the Edge?

What difference can a SMART Marketer make?

The SMART Calling process will remain just a process unless efficiently utilized and proven effective by telemarketers, but wouldn’t you agree if we say vice versa? Undeniably, the telemarketing business, just like all the others have become much dependent on technology breakthroughs in streamlining and refining prospecting methodology.

Below are notable characteristics and skills of a SMART marketer:

A SMART Marketer knows how to reach targets who are ready to move further down the sales funnel.

The SMART Calling technique will enable the agent to prioritize calls in real-time, moving up calls to prospects with the highest SMART scores, giving a higher probability of speaking with the target decision maker. 

Related: Who Says Telemarketing Can’t Drive Leads Further Down the Sales Funnel?

A SMART Marketer knows when the target decision maker himself is most reachable and available to talk.

 

While Lead scores will demographically show you WHO to call, SMART Calling provides the agent the ability to demographically and behaviorally calculate not only with WHO to pursue first but also the best time WHEN to call and  HOW to best reach the target decision maker as to whether via mobile, email or social/professional network sites.

Enabling marketers to reach warm prospects at the right time with less time wasted on busy signals, voicemail or no-answers, and more time for actual talk.

Related: Keep Prospects Glued on the Phone Like Bees to Honey

A Smart Marketer knows how to run an efficient marketing campaign.

SMART Calling processes contact data and makes adjustments in real-time, improves agent productivity levels with less idle time and more talk time, and gets you in front of your target prospect at the best time – when they are most interested and willing to hear what you have to offer.

Let’s simply put it, SMART Marketers  are those who Reach the Right Person at The Right Time, just as how savvy social media posters snappily catch the most followers at a time when they are most ready to Like, Retweet or Share your posts.

 

 

 Be a SMART Marketer, Learn more about our Smart Calling

SMART Calling

Watch Full Video here..

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What to Tell Clients Who Say “You’re too expensive.”

What to Tell Clients Who Say You're Too Expensive

Credit: flicker

First of all, I can’t and won’t blame you if you just put an end to the whole thing right then and there. It’s the equivalent of being “friendzoned” by your love interest. Hey, don’t pursue it, don’t force the issue. And move on. There’s plenty of fish in the sea. You can even throw in the “it’s your loss, not mine” card.

That would have been my advice 10 years ago, when I haven’t had the benefit of a ton of experience yet – both stressful and rewarding — in marketing, sales, negotiation, compromise, and yes, nurturing relationships. I, too, wish it were as simple as that.

But it’s amazing how much the years teach you. As you log on miles in life and in whatever career you are in, so do you gain wisdom – wisdom necessary to prove your point, to refute a claim, and to respond to statements that the inexperienced of the lot dread. Such as when a client tells you — after you’ve gone through all the barriers and checklists and demos – that “Your product/service is too expensive.”

It will stun and it will sting and sometimes, it will leave you groggy – just like what a punch to the temple does to boxers. But when you’ve had more than your fair share of hits like that, you instinctively roll with the punch — and sometimes, throw a counterpunch or two.. Here’s what I’ve learned from experts, from clients, and from my personal experience.

 


Ignore it.


Yes, exactly what I would have said 10 years ago. But why? Because whether you like it or not, there are really times when you don’t have to defend yourself, or in this case, your price. When you’re in a position where you’re filled to the brim with other clients (who don’t complain), it’s better to use your energy on them than waste it engaging with people like this.

In this case, just thank the client for considering your company and tell them you were glad to have helped them. Never apologize for your price and stay connected with these prospects. We’ll never know when they change their minds and vacate to your company. Don’t stop nurturing and keep them interested always. Send them some digital downloads like your case studies or white papers. That’ll make him/her think twice.

 

Read more tips on How to Hold Prospects Longer on a Phone Discussion

 


Admit it. And sound proud.


Say, “Yes, you’re right. But our company – and most other self-respecting companies, actually – believes that price is a reflection of quality. You get what you pay for.”

Then proceed explaining in detail the kind of software or technology behind the product or service, the amount of work or the extraordinary skills required to come up with your special kind of product, or the amount of time it took to develop the product.

Some clients will be enlightened, some will even be ashamed of themselves, while others will not budge. But you’ve sent the message – you get what you pay for. Here are 3 steps to follow when defending a high price.

 


Respond by saying, “What makes you say that?”


This brilliant counter move should put the assertive-bordering-on-aggressive client on the retreat. Follow up by saying, “Expensive compared to what?”
Make sure your tone is genuine and curious and not aggressive. The last thing you want to do is alienate the client or create an air of animosity. Trying to put things in perspective will give the client an opportunity to justify himself, and you, the opportunity to know whether the client knows what he’s talking about.

Why is this important? Because this is the phase where you decide whether to pursue the client or not, and it depends on the client’s answers.

  • If the client honestly doesn’t know the cost, you have a chance to explain why the price they’re paying you is worth the investment. If it’s $5000, compare it to something of a similar value but with less or without ROI, like buying a big bike or a used car, both of which depreciate over time. Your product, meanwhile, alleviates a pain point, and has a huge potential to have a high ROI.
  • If the client has done his research, asked around, and happened to compare you with a cheaper company, then you have another opportunity to emphasize your value. Explain why your rates are higher – you shouldn’t have trouble doing that. And don’t forget to remind the client why he called you even when he’d been quoted a cheaper rate before.
  • If the client is just using the “you’re too expensive” card as an excuse because he’s not yet ready to buy, perhaps you can offer a limited-time-only promo or something to make him reconsider.

Bottom line is, asking “Expensive compared to what?” will open doors for you and potentially tilt the scales in your favor, and even lead to a sale.

 

Here are some tips on how to bounce back from a lousy sales call? Watch this!

Read more details on Rebound After a Horrible Sales Call [Video]

 

You might also like: CHAMP Methodology: Spot on Sales-Ready Leads with These Questions


Don’t Take it Personally


Every time you’re in a position where clients say your product is too expensive, don’t take it personally. Remember, most buyers have a linear way of seeing and understanding value: it’s a good or great price when perceived value is higher than the amount they pay for it, and it’s too expensive when the amount they have to pay outweighs the perceived value.
If it’s any consolation, think that if you’ve never had clients telling you that you’re too expensive, you’re probably not charging enough.

What did you miss: The 5 to 5 Calling Rule for Inbound Leads (That Generated Over 40% Increase in Sales)

 

 

Get better chances of generating leads, download our FREE Ebook: The Ultimate Lead Generation Kit

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Keep Prospects Glued on the Phone Like Bees to Honey

Keep Prospects Glued on the Phone Like Bees to Honey

Research says the longer a caller is able to hold a business prospect on the phone, the better his or her chances are in getting a positive result.

Okay, research didn’t say that.

Common sense says every conversation with a prospect is a chance to establish a connection, build rapport, and eventually, a mutually beneficial relationship. So it follows the longer you keep the person you are calling on the phone, the better the odds of your getting a “yes”.  

But the million-dollar question is: How do you keep a prospect engaged in a phone conversation outside of singing your best rendition of “Sweet Child of Mine” or telling the person at the other end you might be long-lost siblings?

The answer may have something more to do about psychology and sociology than marketing.  

See, making phone calls goes beyond business. In a way, it is a social act with a social function – the sociology part. Your success or failure hinges as much as in the solution to their problem as it is in your ability to connect with the prospect, to appeal to the emotion – the psychology part. How you marry the two to your advantage is entirely up to you.

Here are five simple ways to better engage your prospects on the phone:

  • Communicate clearly and professionally and be polite

You probably know the drill: introduce yourself, the name of the company you are calling for, and the purpose of the call. Always do these in a very clear and professional manner. But before going any further and asking the prospect a lot of personal questions, ask if it is a good time for them to spend a couple of minutes listening to your sales pitch. If it’s not, ask when it would be more convenient.

Remember to apologize when you make a mistake – like mispronouncing a name or even the address. And of course, always thank the prospective customer for their time.

Related: How to Make your Outbound Campaign Standout: A B2B Telemarketing Guide

  • Be Genuinely Interested

It’s important to show sincere enthusiasm during a phone call to better engage customers on the phone. More often than not, you have a company-provided script, but during the critical initial stages – when you’re trying to establish a connection — it’s better to stay off script so that you’d sound more genuine. The person at the other end would appreciate an honest conversation more than one that reeks of aggressiveness and hard selling.

If you show genuine interest in your customer, they will feel a stronger connection to you and the company you represent. Giving your customer information that is helpful to their specific situation is a great way to show that you are really interested in their needs. In case the offer is rejected, you can still follow up a call on them after a couple of weeks or months. We’ll never know, it might be the right time to pitch and close the deal.

Know when is the right time to call a prospect. Learn more about Smart Calling!

  • Know your products and services but avoid tricks and gimmicks

You cannot give what you do not have, right? Believe in your product and explain why your product is the solution to the customer’s problem or need. Here’s the tricky part: If the customer is willing to listen to what you have to offer, you can be sure they don’t want to hear you reading it from a catalogue, otherwise, they’ll do it themselves.

When you’re pitching a product or service, make sure you know it like the back of your hand and you take to heart whatever you are promoting so you won’t have to use gimmicks just to better engage customers on the phone. You’d not only sound smart and confident, but it will also go a long way in helping to establish credibility for you and your company. Trust is essential to close sales and win loyal customers.

Related: Ready, Set, Call: Getting the Most of Telemarketing in Generating Leads

  • Use the words they love to hear

Everybody feels good when they hear the words they love to hear. So go ahead, make your customer feel good. Take advantage of certain words that elicit a specific positive effect on a person depending on the situation. Certain persuasive words encourage customers to buy more than others, like: free, guaranteed, new, improved, and instantly. When customers hear these words, it causes some kind of placebo effect — they’ll enjoy their purchases more than they would have otherwise. It’s even better if the quality of the product or service backs up the initial promise.

Bonus tipsFive Telemarketing Phrases That You Should Skip!

www.partybuddy.com

  • Active Listening

Listening to customers isn’t enough – you really have to listen carefully, paraphrase and repeat their points or concerns. In other words, you really have to have conscious effort in listening to the person you are talking to on the phone. That’s the only way you can respond in an empathetic and understanding way.

You should not only listen well during conversations with customers, but also take notes. Your customer will appreciate when you show that you’ve remembered a detail or two about them and bring it up later in a conversation.

Using active listening on the phone helps your callers feel heard and appreciated. It makes them more likely to engage with your business and become repeat customers. You can never go wrong giving too much attention and care to your customers!

Related: Top 5 Sales Blind Spots in the IT and Software Industry


Bonus Tip: Don’t stop smiling

I used to attend a class in college where we were trained to handle phone calls. I forgot most of the lessons except for one: Always smile when talking on the phone. Why? Smiling actually gives your voice a positive, friendly tone.

Here’s more: Studies have shown that callers notice when the speaker has a smile on their face and when they do not. Keep a smile on your face when speaking to customers on the phone and you are setting the tone for a positive, engaging interaction that they will not forget.


Bottom line

When you’re calling a prospect, don’t ever think that your job is just to get information and close a deal. Think of it as establishing a real connection that would eventually lead to sales. Don’t be a snake oil salesman everyone is avoiding.

If you want to better engage customers on the phone, be clear, be genuinely nice, know what you are selling or offering, actively listening, and always smile. Worst case, even if a caller doesn’t have an immediate need for your product or service, they’ll refer your company to friends and family if you engage them well on the phone. Best case, you have a new customer.

 

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Create better telemarketing strategies, Check out The Savvy Marketer’s Guide

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Are Your B2B Telemarketers Doing Cold Calling Monologues?

Are Your B2B Telemarketers Doing Cold Calling Monologues?

Are your sales representatives talking too much? That may just be the reason why your b2b sales leads aren’t converting. A lead generation campaign is only as effective as the number of qualified leads it allows you to convert. But if your sales people are using the old style of telemarketing or telesales, then you will obviously not get your desired results.

Here are 6 reasons why monologues are no longer effective in converting b2b sales leads:

  • B2b leads are listening more to what each other thinks, instead of listening to a company’s praises for itself. They have lesser and lesser trust in the brands promoting products and services, and often ask the opinions of their peers, friends and relatives before making any sort of purchase.
  • Business leads want to feel special. If your cold calling b2b telemarketers are only the ones talking, then your sales leads will feel alienated instead. They want you to listen to their problems, and they want you to give solutions that will help them remedy these problems. It’s never about how innovative or advanced your products and services are, if it doesn’t give them the right benefits, they won’t purchase it.

Related: The Remedy for Unqualified Leads: Nurture Them Until They’re Ready

  • Cold calling monologues are considered as trademarks of narrow-minded companies, and business leads know full well that these kinds of companies are only after their money. These companies are only after the quick sale, customer service is usually not one of its strong points, and the prospects are seldom qualified b2b sales leads.
  • Purchases resulting from sales monologues often lead to unsatisfied customers or clients because it was never discussed if the offer actually solves a problem of the client in the first place. The cold call was all about how great the offer is, not how appropriate it is to the current situation of the business sales lead.
  • Telesales monologues don’t promote feedback from business sales leads, which means telemarketing scripts remain largely the same for countless campaigns. If the current script offends a business lead, then it would simply continue to do so. Here are some sample cold calling scripts for you.

Don’t Waste a Moment! See Sample Cold Calling Scripts

  • Because b2b leads can’t talk during telesales monologues and no information can be gleaned from the call, so nothing is essentially gained during the call (but there is a large chance that the b2b sales leads have already been lost). This means that monologues never make for a good b2b lead generation campaign.

Related: Keep Prospects Glued on the Phone Like Bees to Honey

If you want to have a good b2b telemarketing campaign, whether for lead generation or telesales, then outsource to a professional b2b telemarketing service provider whose b2b telemarketers are properly trained to build rapport with business sales leads and promote conversations.

 

 

Create better telemarketing strategies, Check out The Savvy Marketer

Or kick off your campaign now with proven lead generation process! 

Dial 888.810.7464

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