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The Only Guide to Email Marketing Analytics You’ll Ever Need

The Only Guide to Email Marketing Analytics You’ll Ever Need

When pilots can’t see the ground or horizon, they rely on six instruments to safely fly an aircraft. These instruments show the plane’s motion, orientation, position, and other critical data. Individually, the information they provide doesn’t mean much but, when taken together, they tell the pilot what to do and where to go.

In some ways, running an email campaign is like flying a plane solely by instrument. The only way to know whether your campaign is actually heading in the right direction is to pay attention to the numbers flashing on your dashboard. But like an aircraft’s instrument panel, a typical email marketing analytics console can be a bit tricky to figure out.

Today’s post provides a complete walkthrough of email marketing analytics. This guide breaks down email analytics into its key component metrics and untangles the relationships between the numbers. By the end of this article, you’ll be able to refine your email marketing analytics suite, know what metrics to focus on, understand what each number means, and find out how to turn raw metrics into actionable insights.

Related: 8 Ways 2017 Will Shape Your 2018 Email Marketing Campaigns

 

Things You Need

Things You Need

Before getting started with email marketing analytics, you need to have a few things in place to ensure smooth flying. You need to set specific goals, tweak your email marketing process, and choose the right supporting platforms. Here’s a quick pre-flight checklist.

 

#1 Define your email marketing goals clearly

The first step in any marketing activity is to set specific goals. What exactly are you trying to achieve with your campaign? Your answer helps you determine which campaign metrics to prioritize later. Some typical email campaign goals include:

  • Reaching out to new prospects
  • Nurturing leads and opportunities
  • Signing up subscribers
  • Verifying/Updating subscription
  • Building awareness for products, events, brand, etc.
  • Closing deals or generating revenues
  • Responding to triggers or actions

Litmus recommends a 4-step process for defining email marketing goals:

  1. Action (what do you want your recipients to do?)
  2. Audience (who are you sending the emails to?)
  3. Benefit (why should your recipients care?)
  4. Results (how will you measure the success of the campaign?)

Clearly, this entire post revolves around step 4, so we’ll go into more depth about choosing the right metrics in a later section.

Related: 7 Types of Emails Your Business Should Send

#2 Refine your email process

Having an end-goal simplifies outlining the exact steps involved in the email campaign. You need a well-defined process in order to identify the things to be measured and tracked. Though exact steps vary from one campaign to another, the following components form the bare essentials for any email marketing initiative (as pointed out by SEMrush):

  • Target market segment (email list)
  • Email content/copy and design (email templates)
  • Email delivery schedules (specific times or triggers)
  • Landing or conversion pages
  • Email marketing platform (more on this later)

Successful email marketing campaigns deliver value through relevant messages. That’s practically what the entire process strives to accomplish. Each component’s performance and contribution is gauged using a specific metric (or set of metrics). That’s why it’s important to smooth out the email marketing process.

#3 Choose the right email marketing platform

There are tons of factors that go into choosing the right email marketing platform, whether you’re doing your campaign in-house or outsourcing it to a third-party provider. One key consideration to carefully weigh is a platform’s reporting and analytics capabilities. Here’s what to look for:

  • Provides metrics on long-term subscriber activity and list health (not just basic “vanity” metrics)
  • Real-time campaign tracking
  • Easy-to-understand reports and summaries
  • Various levels of granularity (from segments to aggregates)
  • Ability to integrate with other channels’ metrics (e.g., Google Analytics)
  • Availability of cross-section and time-series reports

Your email marketing software should enable quick access to the insights you need. You don’t want to spend hours bent over spreadsheets, doing repetitive computations and data retrieval. In addition, it should also be able to provide metrics that tell you about engagement and conversions, not just the usual opens and clicks.

Related: 7 Stats That Prove Email Marketing Is Still The MOST Reliable Channel [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

Metrics to Track

Metrics to Track

Email marketing still ranks as the most data-driven channel in a marketer’s toolkit. From delivery to conversion, each activity is closely tracked, measured, and reported. As a result, the number of different metrics to keep an eye on can get a bit overwhelming. In this section, we’ll take an in-depth look at 10 crucial metrics that should form the core of your email marketing analytics suite.

But first, let’s clear up something that tends to confuse both new and seasoned email marketers alike: the difference between metrics and key performance indicators (KPIs). It’s important to get this straightened out because your usage of these two not-so-interchangeable terms has a huge impact on the way you interpret your analytics.

Jonathan Taylor over at klipfolio points out that the difference between metrics and KPIs goes beyond simple semantics. KPIs are values that show how well you’ve met a given business objective (hence, “P” for “performance”). Metrics, on the other hand, track the status of a specific business process.

In other words, all KPIs are metrics, but not all metrics are KPIs. A metric becomes a KPI if and only if the metric is used to gauge how well or how poorly you’re able to hit a target or goal.

With that out of the way, here’s a list of 10 essential email marketing metrics (arranged in no particular order) you need to thoroughly monitor.

 

#1 Delivery Rate

In email marketing speak, a sent email is “delivered” once it makes it through all the servers, gets past the ISP filters, and reaches a valid recipient’s account without bouncing. The delivery rate is simply the ratio of delivered emails to the number of total emails sent.

In short, delivery rates tell you the percentage of emails sent that got accepted by valid email addresses. It gives you an idea of how successfully you’re able to reach recipients’ email accounts.

Delivery rates, however, don’t indicate how many sent emails actually made it into the recipients’ inbox or how many ended up in the spam folder. That’s why it shouldn’t be your sole measure of deliverability.

Related: Dissecting the World’s First Spam Email: 5 Timeless Lessons We Learned

#2 Inbox Placement Rate

Another deliverability metric is inbox placement rate. This is computed by dividing the number of sent emails that actually reached the inbox over the total number of emails sent.

When your email gets “delivered” to a valid address, the mailbox provider decides whether to place your message in the inbox or junk folder. That’s why even if an email is delivered, it doesn’t necessarily mean the recipient gets a chance to see it.

This is why inbox placement rates are a better deliverability metric than delivery rates. Use delivery rate to gauge your email list’s overall health, but refer to inbox placement when figuring out actual deliverability.

Related: The Art of Writing Email Copies: How to Make It Stand Out from your Prospects’ Inboxes

#3 Soft and Hard Bounces

A bounce happens when an email can’t be delivered. When a bounce occurs, the recipient’s email server rejects an email. This can be due to a number of reasons, which in turn can be permanent or temporary. As MailChimp explains, bounces are classified as soft or hard, depending on how serious the problem is.

Soft bounces are temporary delivery issues caused by problems such as:

  • The recipient’s inbox is full.
  • The email server is down or offline.
  • The email message is too large.

A hard bounce, on the other hand, means that the email encountered a permanent delivery issue such as:

  • Sending to invalid email addresses
  • Recipients having nonexistent domain names
  • Email servers permanently blocking the sender

Among the two, hard bounces are clearly a more serious problem. Hard bounces indicate list quality issues or poor sender reputation.  If left unaddressed, high bounce rates can lead to lower deliverability.

Related: Slaying Your (Mailer) Daemons and Reducing Email Bounces

#4 Open Rate

Email service providers (ESPs) typically compute open rates by taking the number of emails opened and dividing it by the number of emails delivered. While this sounds fairly straightforward, email opens are a little tricky to identify and measure. Usually, ESPs look at two conditions to count email opens (according to CRM provider SuperOffice):

  • Images are displayed in the message (either enabled by recipient or based on settings).
  • The recipient clicks a link in the message.

This makes open rates a somewhat unreliable engagement metric. When an image on an email finishes loading, it’s recorded as opened regardless of whether the recipient actually sees or reads the message. Also, recipients opening your emails more than once can artificially inflate open rates.

That’s why open rates need to be analyzed together with other email metrics, not taken in isolation.

Related: The Pick-up Lines of Email Marketing: How to Increase Open Rates In Just a Few Words

#5 Click-through Rate

Click-through rate (CTR) is calculated by dividing the number of clicks over the volume of delivered emails. CTRs indicate how effectively your subject line, copy, design, offer, and call-to-action are able to engage recipients. The DMA estimates that around 70% of marketers use it to measure their campaign’s success.

But, like open rates, CTRs only show you a partial (and sometimes skewed) picture of email engagement. ConversionXL recommends taking the following into account when analyzing CTRs:

  • Difference between total and unique CTRs
  • Emails and links opened on different devices
  • Recipients clicking on links multiple times
  • Firewall checking links for threats
  • Links posted on the Web or on social media

Again, CTRs shouldn’t be examined in a vacuum. CTRs need to be monitored and compared with other engagement metrics.

#6 Click-to-Open Rate

CTRs take the ratio of clicks to total emails delivered, regardless of whether the emails were opened or not. That means CTRs look at engagement driven by a ton of factors such as timing, subject lines, from lines, etc. CTRs can’t isolate engagement or activity driven by the email’s content/design.

For that, you’re going to measure click-to-open rates (CTORs). Click-to-open rate is the percentage of clicks relative to the number of opened emails.

To make things a bit more concrete, let’s go over a quick example. Let’s say you send 1,000 emails to 1,000 valid addresses. Let’s assume (for simplicity) that all 1,000 messages got delivered and reached recipients’ inboxes. Suppose that 200 people opened the messages and 50 people clicked on a link on the emails. In this example:

  • The CTR is 50 / 1,000 = 0.05, (or 5%)
  • The CTOR is 50 / 200 = 0.4, (or 40%)

So, which metric is better at measuring engagement? CTR or CTOR? Both CTR and CTOR complement each other. CTR measures an email’s overall performance, while CTOR shows the emails performance in terms of what’s actually in it.

#7 Spam Complaint Rate

The spam complaint rate is the percentage of spam complaints relative to the number of delivered emails. Each recipient that marks your email as spam or junk adds to the number of spam complaints. Spam complaint rates indicate negative engagement. The higher this value is, the more unfavorable it is for your campaign.

When the spam complaint rate exceeds some given threshold (usually 0.1%) for some length of time, ISPs tend to look at this as a reason to block your future emails.

To maintain this metric within acceptable levels, make sure to immediately purge your list of contacts who placed spam reports. Also, make sure to send relevant, personalized emails that appeal to your recipients.

Related: Say no to Spam! Ways to Avoid Putting your Email Marketing Campaign to the Dumpsite

#8 Unsubscribe Rate

Anti-spam laws and regulations like CAN-SPAM require you to include an unsubscribe option in your emails. The unsubscribe rate is the number of recipients who requested to stop receiving your emails as a percentage of the total delivered emails. In general, you want to keep unsubscribe rates low.

While it can be concerning to find elevated or rising unsubscribe rates, seeing a few unsubscribes from time to time in a campaign is normal. Neil Patel argues that it’s sometimes okay to see spikes in unsubscribes because it’s a way to remove the not-so-engaged contacts from your list and retain those who really matter.

ReturnPath also warns against analyzing this metric by itself, since a decreasing opt-out rate can indicate either better engagement or a lower inbox placement rate.

#9 List Churn Rate

Your email list’s rate of churn tells you how fast it’s shrinking in a given time period. List churn refers to the number of records removed due to unsubscribes, hard bounces, and spam reports.

Depending on your email platform or ESP, this metric might not be readily available on standard dashboards and campaign reports. There’s still no universally agreed-upon way to compute list churn rates, but one approach suggested by The 60-Second Marketer is a good starting point:

  1. Choose a time period
  2. Determine how many subscribers you’ve lost
  3. Divide that number by the size of your list

GetResponse estimates that the average email list churn rate is between 25% to 30% each year.

#10 Conversion Rate

This is the number of recipients who completed an action (conversions) expressed as a percentage of delivered emails (or some other base number such as total landing page visits). The actions that define a conversion (e.g., filling out a subscription form, downloading an eBook, signing up for a webinar, etc.) depend on the campaign’s goals. This means that your email conversion rate indicates how well you’re actually achieving your objectives.

Conversion rates measure both email engagement and landing page effectiveness. That’s why you need to integrate web analytics into your email platform (step #3 from the previous section). This involves using unique tracking URLs in your emails in order to help you attribute conversions to specific campaigns.

Related: 4 Email Closing Lines That Close Deals (Backed by Concrete Results)

 

The Takeaway

Metrics tell you a lot about your email campaigns. In fact, they reveal everything you need to know to make informed decisions—that is, if you know where and how to look. The things we’ve covered in this guide should help you navigate your campaign toward its objectives. So, keep these ideas in mind and always remember: if you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.

 

 

Read the latest updates on The Savvy Marketer’s Blog

Get a targeted list or Learn more about Callbox Multi-Channel Marketing Strategy

Contact us or Dial 888.810.7464

 

 

Grab a FREE copy of 40 B2B Sales Email Templates for Every Situation! These 40 examples have all been hand-picked from a variety of sources that tested these templates in terms of opens, click-throughs, and replies

40 B2B Sales Email Templates for Every-Situation

What-Elon-Musk-Can-Teach-You-About-Generating-Leads-and-Closing-Deals (Blog Image)
Reset Your Lead Gen Campaigns: Goodbye DST, Hello Holidays (Blog Image)
ERP Software Leads: Effective Lead Gen for ERP Solutions (Blog Image)

 

 

The Only Guide to Email Marketing Analytics You’ll Ever Need

The Only Guide to Email Marketing Analytics You’ll Ever Need

When pilots can’t see the ground or horizon, they rely on six instruments to safely fly an aircraft. These instruments show the plane’s motion, orientation, position, and other critical data. Individually, the information they provide doesn’t mean much but, when taken together, they tell the pilot what to do and where to go.

In some ways, running an email campaign is like flying a plane solely by instrument. The only way to know whether your campaign is actually heading in the right direction is to pay attention to the numbers flashing on your dashboard. But like an aircraft’s instrument panel, a typical email marketing analytics console can be a bit tricky to figure out.

Today’s post provides a complete walkthrough of email marketing analytics. This guide breaks down email analytics into its key component metrics and untangles the relationships between the numbers. By the end of this article, you’ll be able to refine your email marketing analytics suite, know what metrics to focus on, understand what each number means, and find out how to turn raw metrics into actionable insights.

Related: 8 Ways 2017 Will Shape Your 2018 Email Marketing Campaigns

 

Things You Need

Things You Need

Before getting started with email marketing analytics, you need to have a few things in place to ensure smooth flying. You need to set specific goals, tweak your email marketing process, and choose the right supporting platforms. Here’s a quick pre-flight checklist.

 

#1 Define your email marketing goals clearly

The first step in any marketing activity is to set specific goals. What exactly are you trying to achieve with your campaign? Your answer helps you determine which campaign metrics to prioritize later. Some typical email campaign goals include:

  • Reaching out to new prospects
  • Nurturing leads and opportunities
  • Signing up subscribers
  • Verifying/Updating subscription
  • Building awareness for products, events, brand, etc.
  • Closing deals or generating revenues
  • Responding to triggers or actions

Litmus recommends a 4-step process for defining email marketing goals:

  1. Action (what do you want your recipients to do?)
  2. Audience (who are you sending the emails to?)
  3. Benefit (why should your recipients care?)
  4. Results (how will you measure the success of the campaign?)

Clearly, this entire post revolves around step 4, so we’ll go into more depth about choosing the right metrics in a later section.

Related: 7 Types of Emails Your Business Should Send

#2 Refine your email process

Having an end-goal simplifies outlining the exact steps involved in the email campaign. You need a well-defined process in order to identify the things to be measured and tracked. Though exact steps vary from one campaign to another, the following components form the bare essentials for any email marketing initiative (as pointed out by SEMrush):

  • Target market segment (email list)
  • Email content/copy and design (email templates)
  • Email delivery schedules (specific times or triggers)
  • Landing or conversion pages
  • Email marketing platform (more on this later)

Successful email marketing campaigns deliver value through relevant messages. That’s practically what the entire process strives to accomplish. Each component’s performance and contribution is gauged using a specific metric (or set of metrics). That’s why it’s important to smooth out the email marketing process.

#3 Choose the right email marketing platform

There are tons of factors that go into choosing the right email marketing platform, whether you’re doing your campaign in-house or outsourcing it to a third-party provider. One key consideration to carefully weigh is a platform’s reporting and analytics capabilities. Here’s what to look for:

  • Provides metrics on long-term subscriber activity and list health (not just basic “vanity” metrics)
  • Real-time campaign tracking
  • Easy-to-understand reports and summaries
  • Various levels of granularity (from segments to aggregates)
  • Ability to integrate with other channels’ metrics (e.g., Google Analytics)
  • Availability of cross-section and time-series reports

Your email marketing software should enable quick access to the insights you need. You don’t want to spend hours bent over spreadsheets, doing repetitive computations and data retrieval. In addition, it should also be able to provide metrics that tell you about engagement and conversions, not just the usual opens and clicks.

Related: 7 Stats That Prove Email Marketing Is Still The MOST Reliable Channel [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

Metrics to Track

Metrics to Track

Email marketing still ranks as the most data-driven channel in a marketer’s toolkit. From delivery to conversion, each activity is closely tracked, measured, and reported. As a result, the number of different metrics to keep an eye on can get a bit overwhelming. In this section, we’ll take an in-depth look at 10 crucial metrics that should form the core of your email marketing analytics suite.

But first, let’s clear up something that tends to confuse both new and seasoned email marketers alike: the difference between metrics and key performance indicators (KPIs). It’s important to get this straightened out because your usage of these two not-so-interchangeable terms has a huge impact on the way you interpret your analytics.

Jonathan Taylor over at klipfolio points out that the difference between metrics and KPIs goes beyond simple semantics. KPIs are values that show how well you’ve met a given business objective (hence, “P” for “performance”). Metrics, on the other hand, track the status of a specific business process.

In other words, all KPIs are metrics, but not all metrics are KPIs. A metric becomes a KPI if and only if the metric is used to gauge how well or how poorly you’re able to hit a target or goal.

With that out of the way, here’s a list of 10 essential email marketing metrics (arranged in no particular order) you need to thoroughly monitor.

 

#1 Delivery Rate

In email marketing speak, a sent email is “delivered” once it makes it through all the servers, gets past the ISP filters, and reaches a valid recipient’s account without bouncing. The delivery rate is simply the ratio of delivered emails to the number of total emails sent.

In short, delivery rates tell you the percentage of emails sent that got accepted by valid email addresses. It gives you an idea of how successfully you’re able to reach recipients’ email accounts.

Delivery rates, however, don’t indicate how many sent emails actually made it into the recipients’ inbox or how many ended up in the spam folder. That’s why it shouldn’t be your sole measure of deliverability.

Related: Dissecting the World’s First Spam Email: 5 Timeless Lessons We Learned

#2 Inbox Placement Rate

Another deliverability metric is inbox placement rate. This is computed by dividing the number of sent emails that actually reached the inbox over the total number of emails sent.

When your email gets “delivered” to a valid address, the mailbox provider decides whether to place your message in the inbox or junk folder. That’s why even if an email is delivered, it doesn’t necessarily mean the recipient gets a chance to see it.

This is why inbox placement rates are a better deliverability metric than delivery rates. Use delivery rate to gauge your email list’s overall health, but refer to inbox placement when figuring out actual deliverability.

Related: The Art of Writing Email Copies: How to Make It Stand Out from your Prospects’ Inboxes

#3 Soft and Hard Bounces

A bounce happens when an email can’t be delivered. When a bounce occurs, the recipient’s email server rejects an email. This can be due to a number of reasons, which in turn can be permanent or temporary. As MailChimp explains, bounces are classified as soft or hard, depending on how serious the problem is.

Soft bounces are temporary delivery issues caused by problems such as:

  • The recipient’s inbox is full.
  • The email server is down or offline.
  • The email message is too large.

A hard bounce, on the other hand, means that the email encountered a permanent delivery issue such as:

  • Sending to invalid email addresses
  • Recipients having nonexistent domain names
  • Email servers permanently blocking the sender

Among the two, hard bounces are clearly a more serious problem. Hard bounces indicate list quality issues or poor sender reputation.  If left unaddressed, high bounce rates can lead to lower deliverability.

Related: Slaying Your (Mailer) Daemons and Reducing Email Bounces

#4 Open Rate

Email service providers (ESPs) typically compute open rates by taking the number of emails opened and dividing it by the number of emails delivered. While this sounds fairly straightforward, email opens are a little tricky to identify and measure. Usually, ESPs look at two conditions to count email opens (according to CRM provider SuperOffice):

  • Images are displayed in the message (either enabled by recipient or based on settings).
  • The recipient clicks a link in the message.

This makes open rates a somewhat unreliable engagement metric. When an image on an email finishes loading, it’s recorded as opened regardless of whether the recipient actually sees or reads the message. Also, recipients opening your emails more than once can artificially inflate open rates.

That’s why open rates need to be analyzed together with other email metrics, not taken in isolation.

Related: The Pick-up Lines of Email Marketing: How to Increase Open Rates In Just a Few Words

#5 Click-through Rate

Click-through rate (CTR) is calculated by dividing the number of clicks over the volume of delivered emails. CTRs indicate how effectively your subject line, copy, design, offer, and call-to-action are able to engage recipients. The DMA estimates that around 70% of marketers use it to measure their campaign’s success.

But, like open rates, CTRs only show you a partial (and sometimes skewed) picture of email engagement. ConversionXL recommends taking the following into account when analyzing CTRs:

  • Difference between total and unique CTRs
  • Emails and links opened on different devices
  • Recipients clicking on links multiple times
  • Firewall checking links for threats
  • Links posted on the Web or on social media

Again, CTRs shouldn’t be examined in a vacuum. CTRs need to be monitored and compared with other engagement metrics.

#6 Click-to-Open Rate

CTRs take the ratio of clicks to total emails delivered, regardless of whether the emails were opened or not. That means CTRs look at engagement driven by a ton of factors such as timing, subject lines, from lines, etc. CTRs can’t isolate engagement or activity driven by the email’s content/design.

For that, you’re going to measure click-to-open rates (CTORs). Click-to-open rate is the percentage of clicks relative to the number of opened emails.

To make things a bit more concrete, let’s go over a quick example. Let’s say you send 1,000 emails to 1,000 valid addresses. Let’s assume (for simplicity) that all 1,000 messages got delivered and reached recipients’ inboxes. Suppose that 200 people opened the messages and 50 people clicked on a link on the emails. In this example:

  • The CTR is 50 / 1,000 = 0.05, (or 5%)
  • The CTOR is 50 / 200 = 0.4, (or 40%)

So, which metric is better at measuring engagement? CTR or CTOR? Both CTR and CTOR complement each other. CTR measures an email’s overall performance, while CTOR shows the emails performance in terms of what’s actually in it.

#7 Spam Complaint Rate

The spam complaint rate is the percentage of spam complaints relative to the number of delivered emails. Each recipient that marks your email as spam or junk adds to the number of spam complaints. Spam complaint rates indicate negative engagement. The higher this value is, the more unfavorable it is for your campaign.

When the spam complaint rate exceeds some given threshold (usually 0.1%) for some length of time, ISPs tend to look at this as a reason to block your future emails.

To maintain this metric within acceptable levels, make sure to immediately purge your list of contacts who placed spam reports. Also, make sure to send relevant, personalized emails that appeal to your recipients.

Related: Say no to Spam! Ways to Avoid Putting your Email Marketing Campaign to the Dumpsite

#8 Unsubscribe Rate

Anti-spam laws and regulations like CAN-SPAM require you to include an unsubscribe option in your emails. The unsubscribe rate is the number of recipients who requested to stop receiving your emails as a percentage of the total delivered emails. In general, you want to keep unsubscribe rates low.

While it can be concerning to find elevated or rising unsubscribe rates, seeing a few unsubscribes from time to time in a campaign is normal. Neil Patel argues that it’s sometimes okay to see spikes in unsubscribes because it’s a way to remove the not-so-engaged contacts from your list and retain those who really matter.

ReturnPath also warns against analyzing this metric by itself, since a decreasing opt-out rate can indicate either better engagement or a lower inbox placement rate.

#9 List Churn Rate

Your email list’s rate of churn tells you how fast it’s shrinking in a given time period. List churn refers to the number of records removed due to unsubscribes, hard bounces, and spam reports.

Depending on your email platform or ESP, this metric might not be readily available on standard dashboards and campaign reports. There’s still no universally agreed-upon way to compute list churn rates, but one approach suggested by The 60-Second Marketer is a good starting point:

  1. Choose a time period
  2. Determine how many subscribers you’ve lost
  3. Divide that number by the size of your list

GetResponse estimates that the average email list churn rate is between 25% to 30% each year.

#10 Conversion Rate

This is the number of recipients who completed an action (conversions) expressed as a percentage of delivered emails (or some other base number such as total landing page visits). The actions that define a conversion (e.g., filling out a subscription form, downloading an eBook, signing up for a webinar, etc.) depend on the campaign’s goals. This means that your email conversion rate indicates how well you’re actually achieving your objectives.

Conversion rates measure both email engagement and landing page effectiveness. That’s why you need to integrate web analytics into your email platform (step #3 from the previous section). This involves using unique tracking URLs in your emails in order to help you attribute conversions to specific campaigns.

Related: 4 Email Closing Lines That Close Deals (Backed by Concrete Results)

 

The Takeaway

Metrics tell you a lot about your email campaigns. In fact, they reveal everything you need to know to make informed decisions—that is, if you know where and how to look. The things we’ve covered in this guide should help you navigate your campaign toward its objectives. So, keep these ideas in mind and always remember: if you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.

 

 

Read the latest updates on The Savvy Marketer’s Blog

Get a targeted list or Learn more about Callbox Multi-Channel Marketing Strategy

Contact us or Dial 888.810.7464

 

 

Grab a FREE copy of 40 B2B Sales Email Templates for Every Situation! These 40 examples have all been hand-picked from a variety of sources that tested these templates in terms of opens, click-throughs, and replies

40 B2B Sales Email Templates for Every-Situation

What-Elon-Musk-Can-Teach-You-About-Generating-Leads-and-Closing-Deals (Blog Image)
Reset Your Lead Gen Campaigns: Goodbye DST, Hello Holidays (Blog Image)
ERP Software Leads: Effective Lead Gen for ERP Solutions (Blog Image)

 

 

Say no to Spam! Ways to Avoid Putting your Email Marketing Campaign to the Dumpsite

Say no to Spam! Ways to Avoid Putting your Email Marketing Campaign to the Dumpsite

The British sketch comedy program Monty Python continues to be a good source for slapstick material. One compelling sketch from the show involves a restaurant that sells anything as long as it has spam. The comedy here is funny due to the constant repetition of the word “spam.”

But unlike in the show, constant spamming is an annoying problem in the B2B marketing world. It is never a laughing matter. In fact, many companies have suffered heavily because they follow such a practice. Often, these B2B companies were in the first place sincere in setting up their email marketing campaigns. They might as well wonder how they got it all wrong.

The truth is that they went wrong with email composition. Email marketers who know better will see a laughable error in fastening emails with the wrong impressions.

Mailing services have become too stringent. And it is imperative for marketers to adapt to the changes taking place in the world of targeted email marketing.

To increase conversion rates, it is imperative to avoid giving your mails a coat worthy for the spam folder. These tips by MailChimp will sure help:

Save your subject lines

Marketers make mistakes in many ways. Perhaps, the most infamous of these is abusing the subject line. The first thing that targets notice in your mails is the title. This demands a need to make the title as interesting as possible. Still, many marketers motivated by audience responses take it to the extreme. Words are rendered in uppercase letters. Unnecessary symbols are inserted. Keywords like “Best Offer” or “Discount” or “Once in a Lifetime” are encouraged.  Yes, they assert a point. But in reality they help tag your mails as spam. A remedy comes in the form of simple yet compelling subject lines.

Code carefully

Many copies intended for email marketing are automatically junked because they weren’t coded in the appropriate way. Filters have the ability to determine if a message is spam. An HTML email is one thing that fits the profile, especially when it originates from a Word file.

Avoid simultaneous forwarding

Sending the same message to multiple recipients within a target company is another dire practice. Instead of this, consider sending emails to qualified individuals. Better yet, send your messages by batches.

B2B marketers are scared of the spam folder. They should be if they want their companies to remain credible. Consequently, following the basic principles of email marketing is effective in improving sales performance.

Bonus tip from Salesforce – Build an excellent email list from scratch

Appropriately composing your email list is vital to keeping your messages from being labeled spam. But this is something almost all businesses in the B2B and even B2C communities struggle.

Luckily, this infographic by Salesforce offers clear insights into how marketers can create accurate and relevant email lists.

5 Steps to Build Amazing Email Lists from the Ground Up

Via Salesforce

Do you have your own way of keeping your precious emails from the spam folder? Share it in the comment section below.

 

 

Read the latest updates on The Savvy Marketer’s Blog

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Grab a FREE copy of 40 B2B Sales Email Templates for Every Situation! These 40 examples have all been hand-picked from a variety of sources that tested these templates in terms of opens, click-throughs, and replies

40 B2B Sales Email Templates for Every-Situation

Choosing The Right Email Marketing Platform (Things to Consider)
Creating a Content Upgrade and Using Them to Grow Your Email List

Lackluster Email Marketing Campaign? Get a boost now!

Lackluster Email Marketing Campaign Get a boost now!

Email marketing can be a pain in the butt when not enough planning and execution go into it. Considering it’s still the most popular and b2b lead generation marketing channel out there – and this is despite of the growing power of social media and content – there’s really no way that a lead generation company would downplay their email efforts.

Not all campaigns soar high, though. Sometimes, no matter how hard you work on it, the campaign will always go through a relative slump that could hurt the chances of achieving your goals. B2B leads are a little tricky to understand, that’s why predicting their response behavior may vary through time.

Here are some tips on how to drastically improve your email marketing campaign, which will also bear fruits for your other efforts such as telemarketing and appointment setting:

1. Less is more.

According to ReturnPath, the average user receives 416 commercial email a month. Short online attention spans, coupled with the average overcrowded inbox, mean copy needs to engage and inform in the most succinct way possible. But don’t be deceived; condensing your content, choosing the right words, and simplifying email structure requires more thought.

2. Invert the pyramid

Take a page from journalism and don’t “bury the lead.” Communicate your key message, benefits, and value propositions “above the fold” to grab reader attention. As you write, ask yourself, “How will reading this help the reader overcome a real business challenge?”

Here are two body copy examples for our fictitious client, Video Game Piracy Protection (VGPP):

3. Make it personal

Your emails should include personalization for each recipient. It helps focus reader attention, encourages further reading, and according to Experian, it can increase open rates by 29 percent and click through rates by 41 percent. Include the name of the recipient’s organization so they can relate the benefit of your solution to their workplace context. Mention their name once in the email copy, maybe twice, but no more.

4. Repeat after me: Do not repeat.

Repetition makes you seem lazy. Each step of the reader’s journey, from subject line to body copy to CTA to landing page, needs to add value. For the recipient, reading the same copy on a landing page that they just read in an email makes them think, “The sender didn’t value my time enough to add additional information, so I’m not going any further.” A landing page, in particular, needs to expand on the benefits outlined in the email.

5. Remind and Revise

To effectively capture leads, your emails should always comprise at least a launch and reminder sequence. Brevity is key. So is communicating your solution’s benefits. Consider how to strike a balance between the two. Draft, review, revise, (repeat) and proofread copy. One spelling error can undo all your good work.

6. Value Localization

Keeping the aforementioned best practices in mind to ensure clear, concise, personalized, value-adding copy, you may also need to consider the need for localization. If an email is translated for use in several countries, be wary of cultural differences, particularly with regard to humor and slang. If the campaign budget limits localization to a simple translation, repeat the mantra: “Less is more.”

Source: 6 Simple Ways to Improve Your Email Marketing

4 Email Marketing Gems – Born Out of Writing 1,000 Emails

Justin Bridegan of MarketingSherpa shares 4 things he learned from writing a lot of email copy:

Having written close to 1,000 emails for MarketingSherpa promoting our marketing products over the past few years, I’ve learned a couple of things I thought I would share with you, many of them from my own mistakes.

At Summits, when people recognize my name from their inbox, they ask, “What have you found that works?” What a loaded question, right?

I’ve felt much like Edison, but with a marketing spin on it. I have not failed, I’ve just found 10,000 ways on how to not write an email.

Much like you, my writing over time has evolved to include some semi-universal best practices which many of us are familiar with, but sometimes get lost in the marketing translation from company logic to customer logic. So, here is a quick refresher.

Tip #1. Write your copy with the understanding that your audience is likely not reading, but skimming

It’s been said most people are either “filers,” who create a specific file folder for each email, or “pilers,” who let the inbox pile up with no hope in sight. Either way, your message is up against an already overflowing inbox. Standing out – and quickly – is the only hope you have.

I’m not saying all email messages have to be short, but they should be readable in a skim format. Your audience should be able to understand the main message in five to 10 seconds. Subject lines should be point first or last, not middle. Intro paragraphs should also be short and lead into the body copy, usually three sentences or less. Overall, you should test your email subject lengths to know what your audience prefers to read.

Tip #2. Stop selling to your audience and offer real value

Nobody enjoys being bombarded with product offerings and specials. Don’t get me wrong, we all like a good deal, just not all of the time and not every day. Your emails should be an ongoing conversation and always offer real value. Ask yourself, “Does this pass the ‘so what’ test?” If not, then scrap what you have and start over.

Use benefit-focused language such as “Get” or “Receive” without making them think about all of the things they have to do. You need to build some trust with your audience and make sure you provide an email address so they can respond with feedback.

Tip #3. Clarity is the key

Have you ever read an email and not understood what they were trying to say? I know I have. From internal acronyms nobody outside the office understands to copy containing three or four calls-to-action, too much clutter is a conversion killer.

Focus on one key benefit, map it to their pain point and solve it. Your email tone should convey a helpful and friendly voice. Never use words that don’t convey value, like “Submit,” or “Click.” When possible, provide more clarity and quantify your message. For example, use “Get instant online access to all 32 marketing search journals” instead of “Download now.”

Tip #4. Don’t take my word for it – test

What works for one company doesn’t always work for another. The only true way to know what works in your messaging is to test. For the MarketingSherpa audience, those who have purchased from us in the past tend to like short, right to the point emails, while new sign-ups tend to like more visual and lengthy copy. It is about tailoring your messages.

We’ve gleaned these insights from A/B testing. Before you implement any of my tips, I suggest you test them with your unique audience and product to see if they also work for you.


This article
originally appeared on MarketingSherpa.com.

The Three Important Components Of Any Email Marketing Campaign

The Three Important Components Of Any Email Marketing Campaign

Email marketing remains to be an important facet in the life of a business.

Presently, around 73% of B2B marketers rely on emails for transacting deals and exploring aailable solutions for a variety of problems (Salesforce, 2015). For this reason alone, delivering messages straight to your target clients’ can help initiate high-value engagements that are likely to result in purchases.

In fact, Convince and Convert noted in a 2013 study that “44% of email recipients made at least one purchase last year based on a promotional email.”   This is supported by an Imagine Pub post that reveals eight to ten recipients of B2B messages would buy something. You couldn’t possibly take these stats like they mean nothing to revenue when they actually establish the difference between business failure and success. The most important thing it seems at the moment: Refuse email marketing, you refuse revenue.

You can always conduct a good old-fashioned email blast to spread word about your company and what it is offering, but having a prospect make that crucial click depends entirely on whether your messages are appropriately constructed.

Email Lead Generation: How Most Marketers are Getting it Wrong

Related Post: Email Lead Generation: How Most Marketers are Getting it Wrong

To ensure a more successful email campaign requires a thorough understanding of the three most important parts of an email that can significantly increase open rates:

Introducing the no-risk offer

This is your product, service, or a simple taste of what your business could do for your future customers. With the explicit announcement that this comes at absolutely no cost to your prospects, there is nothing that would hold them back from giving your offer a try.

An obvious call-to-action

Now that you’ve made it clear that your email is absolutely free, along with the product or service that comes with it, tell your prospects what to do next by giving them a call-to-action that is more obvious and conspicuous than the no-risk offer.

Final encouragement to respond

Most prospects like to read through the whole email to make sure there is no catch anywhere, especially if they found your offer particularly tempting. So to end your email properly, remind your prospect again about what a great offer this is and encourage them to sign up now, if they haven’t already.

It’s not so hard creating emails with all the right elements in place. But you can always improve your chances of acquiring quality B2B leads by allowing a professional b2b lead generation company to hold the reins of your campaign. Especially if it has an impressive portfolio of successful campaigns and satisfied clients, such a company can achieve a certain amount of notice that your brand deserves.

 Employ email marketing and other lead generation channels in your campaign today!