Consulting vs. Selling: Crafting a Winning Business Pitch

Consulting vs. Selling: Crafting a Winning Business Pitch

You already have a business plan. All you need to do is pitch it to some investors and convince them to invest in your business.

That looks so easy in writing, but everyone who had been through this process will tell you how unpleasant the feeling was – it’s like walking through a gauntlet. Your business plan is not the only thing undergoing some scrutiny here but your capability as well. How well you deliver your pitch will reflect that capability.

A winning business pitch does not just happen. It is the product of many elements which we are going to lay down in this article. But before we get down to the juice, let’s lay down some strong foundations.

A strong building has basically four strong pillars to hold everything together. The same goes for a winning business pitch. It should have:

1. Simplicity

Sure, you are talking to prospects but it does not necessarily mean that you have to use all the jargon to impress them. On the contrary, speaking in a language, your customers can understand well will give you a better fighting chance.

Related: The 3 C’s of Selling to the C-Suite and Closing Large Deals [INFOGRAPHIC]

2. Clarity

If you can convince your prospect within the first 8 minutes of your pitch, you have captured the rest of his attention. Thus, you have to focus on being understood than persuading your listener.

3. Passion

Passion is the element that will make your business pitch memorable, unique, and convincing. Your listeners will be able to sense through your pitch whether you are sold to the idea you’re selling to them or not. Don’t hold back because it could be what will make or break your pitch.

4. A lot of practice

No matter how passionate you are or how well-written your pitch is but you haven’t practiced it, then it is nothing.

 

With the four pillars in place, you are now ready to build a winning business pitch. Let’s take a closer look at each of them:

1. Your hook should be interesting

Venture capitalist Charlie O’Donnell confessed in his short blog post that, VCs get bored easily and their mind gets continuously distracted making it difficult for them to focus.

He also added that starting the pitch by introducing who you are and trying to convince them how qualified you are is a big no-no. The fact that a VC allowed being your audience means they have already vetted you.

Even if you are pitching to businesses, the same reality applies. Thus, you need to be straight to the point and capture your audience’s attention. As Renee Zellweger’s Dorothy told Tom Cruise’s Jerry, “You had me at hello,” you should create the same impact on your clients.

Related: Ditch that Pitch: The Case Against Selling to First-Time Prospects

2. You need to show them not only your solution but the problem

No matter how good your solution is if you haven’t identified what the problem really is, the solution is nothing. Once you identify that, you have to make sure that your audience understands that there really is a problem. Also, make sure that your audience feels a certain pain so they will seek a remedy.

3. Create a unique solution

It’s not enough that you have a solution. It should be a unique one, something that makes you a cut above the rest. Businesses want to hear that you’re offering something new. Think for a minute, what can your company offer them?

4. Confidence shows credibility

Confidence makes a lot of difference in whatever you’re doing. Your confidence reflects your capability and how much you believe in your product.

Look your audience in the eye when you deliver your pitch, and answer them with as much clarity in your voice as possible. Even when you faced tough questions, do not wave them off but discuss them. It could be your only chance to answer those kinds of questions.

Lastly, don’t forget to show your audience the results. Build your credibility further by showing them positive results as well as your determination to get the job done.

Related: Phone Sales Closing Techniques That Will Get You More Deals

 

In Closing

The manner you present your pitch will leave an impression -positive, negative, neutral – to your audience. What matters most is that you present your pitch with genuineness, clarity, and confidence. All of this can be done through a compelling story and by listening to your audience as well.

 

Author Bio:

Rebecca Matias

Rebecca Matias is a Business Development Manager at Callbox. She is a proactive marketer who is willing to share her passion, leadership principles and craft in marketing. Follow Rebecca on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

 

Build, attract and engage potential customers with Callbox Digital Marketing Solutions

Dial 888.810.7464 | Chat on WhatsApp

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

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Creating Loyal Customers Through Curiosity Marketing

Creating Loyal Customers Through Curiosity Marketing

Curiosity is innate to man. Even as infants, we crawled to sockets and put keys in our mouth out of curiosity. Google is an expert at feeding man’s curiosity—using our insatiable need to know.

In business, the goal is to get the buyer’s attention and maintain it through engagement. Curiosity is a useful tool towards this goal.

Just like when you go out on a first date, getting married is not your initial goal. Curiosity is what got your date’s attention and what will keep it. As in business, your goal is to create trust and conversation, without telling all at the first meeting.

But, curiosity can lead to frustration. This is where businesses can fail. They dump features and benefits on the mind’s of their customers but fail to close the deal. Why?

Information overload requires so much mental effort that the decision-making process slows down. We are naturally irritated by the need to decide in 10 minutes—one of the reasons why cold calling fails.

Curiosity marketing, however, can turn a decision maker into an impulse buyer. You don’t buy the latest smartphone after analyzing all the specs. You purchase because it’s the best camera phone of 2018—and you need to experience it yourself.

 

How Does One Create Curiosity?

Economist and educator George Loewenstein at Carnegie Mellon University revealed that curiosity takes place when there is a gap between what man knows and what man wants to know. To create curiosity, we need to:

  1. Create a difference between what they know and want to know.
  2. Provide information in bits to maintain interest.

Instead of setting your customers up for cognitive overload, you continuously feed their curiosity and keep them engaged.

Related: 5 Strong CTA Examples (with Solid CTRs and Conversions) to Learn From

 

Curiosity Marketing for B2B Companies

In B2B, the goal is more long-term than a one-off deal. Where products and services are more complicated than off-the-rack goods, it takes commitment and intent planning to work. Curiosity marketing, when done right leads to customer-centered engagement, solutions that solve problems and achieve goals, build strong relationships and opens buyers to new opportunities for better results.

Related: Account-based Marketing: Why It Delivers the Highest ROI

 

5 Ways to Use Curiosity Marketing in B2B

1. Focus on Internal Curiosity

Curiosity marketing begins within the B2B company. A lot of people see apples fall from a tree, but only Newton asked why. You need a team of Newtons with an insatiable curiosity towards your buyers, their key decision makers, the Key Performance Indicators of your marketing strategy, and more. Curiosity marketing is creating the A-ha moment similar to the Eureka moment you had when your product or service was born.

2. Be an Expert at First Impressions

When you get a “yes” to a first date with someone you like, you want to make the best first impression. You buy flowers, dress to impress, and pick the right place. In B2B, the first impression dramatically influences decision-making. It is vital to invest in your brand image to position yourselves high in the market and retain loyal customers.

Related: What Dating Teaches Us About Face-to-Face Sales Meetings [INFOGRAPHIC]

3. Provide Information Necessary in a Step-By-Step Selling Process

Make it easy for decision-makers to seal the deal by giving only the information they need to know to complete every step of the sale. Give them small decisions to make in the span of their working relationship with you. This strategy will minimize the likelihood of making the wrong choices, making it easier to work with you.

Related: Stages of a B2B Sales Pipeline (and Ways to Increase Your Sales Success Rate)

4. Use Storytelling to Get Your Message Across

You can hear without listening, look but not see—that is if you see something like a mere distraction and nothing that will help you solve your problems now. You don’t want your customers to passively skim through your product and get on with their daily affairs. You want to hold their attention like water in a desert that a thirsty man will run towards. So you need a transformation story that will direct your buyer from where he is now to where he could be—pain vs. desire.

5. Study Your Buyers More than You Study Your Competitors

You can’t promise to solve your buyer’s problems if you don’t know what they struggle with. Knowing their pains and desires will tell you what message is relevant and will not be filtered out. You need to get in the mind of the decision makers, understand what their buying agendas are, and what triggers them to buy. In marketing terms, spend time documenting your buyers’ personas. Studies show that high-performing companies that exceed lead and revenue goals invest more in knowing what drives their buyers and how they decide.

Related: How to Use the 3 Levels of Pain Points for Better Sales Conversations

 

In Conclusion

Curiosity marketing works because it achieves two goals—that of the buyer and the company they are buying from. There’s no magic ingredient to catch the attention of key decision makers and make them buy into your idea.

It takes a lot of hard work to create a team of curious people along with optimizing their branding, filling in the curiosity gap without creating cognitive overload, getting the right message across, and documenting buyer personas.

The rewards more than pay for the efforts as you earn the loyalty of your customers who are impressed with your ability to helping them reach their personal goals.

 

Author Bio:

Rebecca Matias

Rebecca Matias is a Business Development Manager at Callbox. She is a proactive marketer who is willing to share her passion, leadership principles and craft in marketing. Follow Rebecca on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

 

Build, attract and engage potential customers with Callbox Digital Marketing Solutions

Dial 888.810.7464 | Chat on WhatsApp

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

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This Labor Day, Start Future-Proofing Your Marketing Team

This Labor Day, Start Future-Proofing Your Marketing Team

Here at the Savvy Marketer, we’ve talked a great deal about the ever-evolving marketing landscape and how marketers can keep up. If there’s any single trend amid all these developments that are hard to miss, it’s that the pace of change itself is accelerating.

It seems like almost every day, we face a new marketing direction or come across a novel piece of technology that promises to “revolutionize” or “disrupt” the way we do things as marketers. But while change surely brings opportunities to the table, it carries with it a lot of challenges, too.

For example, the marketing tech ecosystem has now grown to more than 5,000 solutions, up from 200 products in 2011. That’s according to stats compiled by Scott Brinker which also find that 43% of marketers use 6 to 10 martech solutions, while nearly half of businesses (47%) admit they’re having a hard time keeping up with recent marketing trends.

This shift is taking place across all areas of marketing, not only with the tools we’re using but also with the strategies we rely on, the roles and responsibilities we perform, and the capabilities and skills we need to have. Marketers who can’t keep up with any of these developments run the risk of getting left behind.

That’s why, for this upcoming Labor Day weekend, it’s time for you to start thinking about enabling your entire team to adapt and thrive in an ever-evolving marketing world. Today’s blog post offers up some insights on how to make your marketing team robust enough to meet these challenges head-on.

 

Embrace the right mindset

Embrace the right mindset

As marketing remains in a state of ever-increasing flux, it can be very easy to lose sight of what marketing is all about. Marketing exists to grow the business. That was true yesterday, and it will always be true no matter what tools or tactics dominate the scene.

This is why the first step to future-proofing your marketing team is to develop a growth mindset at both individual and collective levels.

Dr. Carol Dweck, Professor of Psychology at Stanford University, identifies two overall types of mindset that people have: fixed and growth mindsets. When facing an obstacle, someone with a fixed mindset tends to ask “Do I have what it takes?”, while someone with a growth mindset raises “How can I take on this challenge?” Folks with a fixed mindset assume that we’re born with specific abilities, while people who follow a growth mindset believe abilities can be learned and improved.

A growth mindset encourages taking on challenges, making mistakes, and learning from failures. These are exactly what a constantly-shifting marketing landscape needs. In fact, growth mindset applied to marketing is what “growth hacking” essentially means.

Related: Sales Productivity: Tips From the Top Salespeople

 

Define and fill essential roles

Define and fill essential roles

Making your team future-proof means assigning the right roles to the right people. But with job titles going in and out of fashion all the time, it can be difficult to figure out how to structure your team.

According to sources like HubSpot and Digital Marketing Institute, tomorrow’s marketing team will most likely resemble a miniaturized but fully-functioning content publishing and distribution operation. It’s going to be made up of marketers who create content, marketers who make sure that the content reaches the target audience (through both inbound and outbound channels), and marketers who ensure that the entire process runs smoothly.

Here’s what that team will most likely look like:

  • Team Leader/Editor
  • Content Contributors
  • Designers
  • Developers
  • Data and Analytics Specialists
  • SEO/SEM Specialists
  • Social Media Specialists
  • Email Marketing Specialists
  • Phone Specialists

Related: What is Smarketing? (And Why It’s Important)

 

Gain and sharpen crucial skills

Gain and sharpen crucial skills

When we hear the term “skills gap”, we often think of a shortfall in technical skillsets. But the skills gap covers soft skills as well. In fact, some sources argue that the best way for people in specific positions to stay relevant in the next decade or so is to sharpen their soft skills.

While it’s certainly an advantage for marketers to be technically proficient, the changes happening in the modern marketing workplace require a healthy balance of soft and hard skills. As marketing increasingly becomes a collaborative and transparent effort, soft skills can help maintain teamwork, flexibility, and accountability among marketers.

Digital Marketing Institute names nine essential soft skills that all marketers need to possess, regardless of expertise or specialization:

  • Intuition
  • Curiosity
  • People skills
  • Persuasion skills
  • Analytical skills
  • Technological savvy
  • Ability to adapt
  • Multi-tasking
  • Creativity

 

Stack up your toolkit

Stack up your toolkit

It goes without saying that preparing your team for the future means equipping them with the right tools. Technology powers a huge part of modern marketing that it accounts for 22% of the marketing budget. So, how do you make sure your marketing toolkit enables (rather than hinders) your team?

Triniti Burton of Integrate, a demand orchestration software company, outlines eight must-have types of martech tools:

  • Marketing Automation
  • Top-Funnel Automation
  • Analytics Software
  • Content Experience Platform
  • Website Tools
  • Customer Advocacy
  • ABM and Predictive Intelligence
  • Sales and Collaboration Tools

When building your martech stack, the following questions can help you initially evaluate a particular tool:

  • What specific goal or problem do you want the tool to address?
  • How well can you meet the goal or solve the problem without the tool?
  • How does the tool align with your current process?
  • Does the tool add or take away a layer of complexity in your process?
  • Do you have the resources and capabilities to successfully deploy the tool?
  • Can you demonstrate to others how the tool supports specific business goals?

Related: Best Marketing Tools to INCREASE Sales Leads Production

 

Conclusion:  Labor Day is the perfect time to think of ways to help everyone in your marketing team meet tomorrow’s marketing challenges.

 

From all of us here at Callbox, we salute the hard work of every marketer and sales practitioner. Have a relaxing and meaningful Labor Day!

 

Author Bio:

Rebecca Matias

Rebecca Matias is a Business Development Manager at Callbox. She is a proactive marketer who is willing to share her passion, leadership principles and craft in marketing. Follow Rebecca on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

 

Do you want more leads?

Dial 888.810.7464 | Chat on WhatsApp

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

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The MQL vs. SQL Difference and How Leads Move Through the Sales Funnel
Pre-event Marketing: Boost Event Turnout Through Outreach

The Best Marketing Podcasts and What You’ll Learn From Them

The Best Marketing Podcasts and What You'll Learn From Them

The advent of technology has opened more opportunities for learning and self-improvement. Podcasts provide a plethora of ideas you can learn from even when you’re on-the-go.

Most of these podcasts are hosted by thought leaders who attract other leaders to guest in their shows. The result is a wealth of knowledge that proves valuable for your life and career. In this article, we have listed some of our favorite marketing podcasts and what you can learn from:

 

The Fizzle Show

From the creators of Fizzle.co comes this lighthearted fountain of knowledge for online entrepreneurs. The show talks about building a business with a purpose, creating a valuable product/service, and increasing traffic to your site. The biggest takeaway from The Fizzle Show, however, were lessons on how to engage and capture your target audience.

Lesson #1: Know Your Audience More Than They Know Themselves

Sun Tzu’s “Art of War” teaches the valuable lesson of winning the battle. First, you have to know yourself and your enemy. The same goes true with your business if you want it to succeed.

By principle, your target audience is the ‘enemy’ you’re trying to capture; thus, you need to have a genuine understanding of your audience. What are the problems they face?. What are their needs, challenges, and desires?. If you know your audience, you can better communicate with them better using the language they understand.

Related: Capture More B2B Sales Leads with Multi-Channel Marketing

 

StartUp

Gimlet Media is a known producer of high-quality narrative podcasts, and StartUp was their first show. It focuses on the life of Alex Blumberg and how he built the company from the ground up.  

Lesson #2: Transparency with Your Audience

We often hear about the success of startups rather than their challenges and their failure. StartUp dares to be different by showings the side of startup companies behind closed doors. The show features raw conversations between Alex and different investors, his wife, and his team. There’s no sugarcoating here. What you get are the real challenges and concerns most startup companies experience.

Related: 10 Affordable Marketing Ideas for Software Startups

 

ConversionCast

ConversionCast is the brainchild of the top lead generation service, LeadPages. It is a resource for digital marketers with topics on optimization, conversion, growing your email list, and customer sign-ups, among others.

The 15-minute length episodes are a great way to add to your knowledge while driving to work. ConversionCast features different guests who are have been successful in their chosen field and industry.

Lesson #3: Test Your Ideas with Your Audience

ConversationCast recommends the Lean Startup methodology for testing an idea. This technique includes split-testing any idea you’d like to experiment and then to measure the results via actionable metrics. From there you can decide whether or not to pursue your strategy or try something else.

Related: 5 Strong CTA Examples (with Solid CTRs and Conversions) to Learn From

 

The Smart Passive Income Podcast

Pat Flynn refers to himself as an online marketing guinea pig. He is passionate about content marketing and has built a successful podcast, blog, and YouTube channel himself. He often shares what he learns from the ideas he tests. He also interviews young entrepreneurs who are successful in building a business.

Lesson #4: “The Riches are in the Niches”

The saying does ring true, and we see this with the host and his guests. It’s striking to see individuals succeed when they understand a niche better than anyone else. This way, they can understand the needs of their specific audience like never before.

Related: Happy Independence Day! Now Break Free from the Content Marketing Trap

 

The Tim Ferriss Show

The best-selling author of “The 4-Hour Work Week,” Tim Ferriss talks about a wide range of topics. An advocate of learning, it seems like he has no plans of stopping.  

Lesson #5: Never Stop Learning

Some of his famous guests include Arnold Schwarzenegger, Peter Thiel, and Tony Robbins, who are all at the top of their game yet they never stop learning new things every single day.

 

The #AskGaryVee Show

Is your business on social media? The Facebook algorithm is ever-changing, and marketing on social media has become increasingly competitive. No one seems to understand this better than Gary Vaynerchuck.

Founder of the creative agency, Vaynermedia, Gary Vaynerchuck talks about smart content marketing, tried and tested practices, and the latest social media trends. He and his team are always testing new social media strategies, platforms, and post types. Then they share their discoveries and recommendations on the podcast.

Lesson #6: React Fast to Social Media Changes

You can gain a lot if you hop on a growing platform earlier than others because there are less competition and a host of opportunities.

Related: Leverage Social Media’s Influence to Reach More Targeted Customers

 

The Suitcase Entrepreneur

Natalie Sisson runs her business and the podcast while traveling the world. She is an inspiration and a great teacher in entrepreneurship and online marketing. Natalie also features successful online entrepreneurs in the podcast.

Lesson #7: Finding Your Why

Natalie is most passionate about finding your WHY in everything. She encourages entrepreneurs to do something they care about. Your business should resound your purpose and reason for being.  It is the reason why your audience will buy from you. It is the story you share with your target audience. Your WHY is what sets you apart from the competition and attracts your ideal customer.

 

Final Thoughts

Podcasting is a smart new way to learn new things about everything including marketing. If your digital marketing efforts are sapped up, it’s time to get a few tips from successful entrepreneurs and marketers in the industry.

 

Author Bio:

Rebecca Matias

Rebecca Matias is a Business Development Manager at Callbox. She is a proactive marketer who is willing to share her passion, leadership principles and craft in marketing. Follow Rebecca on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

 

Do you want more leads?

Dial 888.810.7464 | Chat on WhatsApp

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

10 Lead Magnet Ideas to Grow Your Sales Pipeline
The MQL vs. SQL Difference and How Leads Move Through the Sales Funnel
Pre-event Marketing: Boost Event Turnout Through Outreach

 

How to Handle The 5 Common Sales Objections in IT Selling

How to Handle The 5 Common Sales Objections in IT Selling

Computers are non-negotiables for any thriving business. Small enterprises to large companies have them. It follows that IT sales experts are in-demand.

While selling IT products and services can bring you immense good fortune (if you earn uncapped commission), it’s not an easy sale.

The world of computers and networking is dynamic, continually changing. It can be confusing and overwhelming to the layman. Hence, it is your job as the IT sales expert to guide your clients to make the best decision for the sake of productivity, efficiency, and growth of the organization.

 

What Makes IT Selling Difficult?


A career in IT sales is good because there are plenty of job opportunities in this global industry. However, IT selling is highly-technical. You need to convince your clients that something they barely understand can provide a significant value to their organization. You could be a great salesman before you enter the IT sector only to find it’s a world of new knowledge itself. If you want to succeed in IT sales you must have these qualities:

  • Excellent selling skills
  • A passion for IT issues
  • Negotiation skills
  • Excellent Time-management and Self-management skills
  • Report writing and proposal writing skills
  • Presentation skills
  • Team Player
  • Most important, strong technical knowledge

Related: IT Consulting Leads: Finding New Business for Your Tech Consulting Firm

 

It Matters What You’re Selling


IT Selling can be categorized into three: Hardware, Software, and Services, each of which comes with challenges. If you want to have experience in all three, you may find that it’s an entirely different ride every time.

Hardware sales are the easiest to understand and sell; primarily because you can see it and touch it. Computers, monitors, routers, and servers fall under this category. However, it is a vast market with a lot of competition. The profit margin of hardware sales continues to contract as the industry moves forward to go hardware-free.

Software sales require specialization. Much like selling custom products, software can be expensive. To be effective, IT sales professionals need to know an industry-specific software inside and out. Income can be promising, but the sales cycle is often lengthy and complicated.

IT Service sales is the most profitable of all three. It combines hardware and software solutions bundled with installation and perhaps maintenance and servicing, all in one package. As an IT service sales professional, expect to work with experts in various areas of the IT sector as a team.

Related: The Secret to Making Irresistible Offers: An IT Company’s Guide to Selling

 

Facing the Difficulties of IT Selling


There is nothing easy about IT selling, but it is highly-rewarding as you influence a positive change in an organization. When issues in the sales cycle arise, you may be tempted to avoid the issue and hope it will resolve on its own.

However, an objection can be a golden opportunity to reassure your client that you are an expert and the best person to help them with their problem. If you are currently faced with a decision maker who is only half-convinced of your proposition, here are the five common objections you should study and learn to overcome:

1. Cost

Price is a primary concern of IT professionals. These people are working with budget constraints—even more, limited in the case of small enterprises. Consider offering a lightweight solution that is effective and suitable to their budget. Be creative in your value proposition and convince your client of the long-term cost savings that will balance the upfront cost in time.

2. Necessity or Luxury?

When you are selling an upgrade, automation or software coverage, you may have to deal with a skeptical client; again with a limited budget. You have to be the expert that can tell your client when a system is cutting-edge and when it is already outdated. Emphasize the speed of software evolution.

Also, convince your customer of the cost-efficiency of buying the product or service. For instance, a software upgrade can increase performance and security, eliminating the need to buy new hardware.

Likewise, IT support can save your customer on the cost of purchasing upgrades in the future. In particular, if your customer does not have a valid application software coverage, their company would have to pay more to upgrade their applications. Incompatibility of current applications with future network additions also leads to additional costs.

Related: Enterprise Sales vs SMB Sales: A Side-by-Side Comparison [INFOGRAPHIC]

3. Complexity

Another primary concern is that it may be difficult for employees to learn and adapt to the new system. Introduce solutions that are user-friendly. These customers require plug and play products. If training is necessary, ensure that they will be guided throughout the process and emphasize sustainability.

4. Integration with Current System

Most companies will avoid a complete overhaul and replacement of their current systems. Your goal is to show them how they can improve performance and efficiency with ease. Introduce solutions that integrate seamlessly with their system for little cost and downtime.

Related: Industry Insights: The 5 Types of Buyers You Meet in Cloud Selling

5. Employees

A company that employs in-house technicians can make it harder for you to sell your IT solutions to them. Emphasize that your goal is to support their in-house team and help identify and resolve issues quickly. Open them to issues that are outside the scope and experience of their in-house techs. You may be offering solutions that increase employee efficiency through the delegation of menial and repetitive tasks. Hence, they can focus on more important business matters.

Related: How to Sell to Match the 3 Types of IT Decision Makers

 

In Conclusion

There are times when you will encounter clients that resist change. Win them over to your side, guiding them through solutions that can help them succeed in their business. An effective IT sales professional will listen to a client’s concerns and flawlessly provide the answers as the expert they can count on.

 

Author Bio:

Judy Caroll

Judy Caroll is a marketing executive at Callbox. She is a blogger, online marketer and loves to share with you the best stuff in sales and marketing. Follow Judy on Twitter and Google+.

 

 

Do you want more IT leads?

Dial 888.810.7464 | Chat on WhatsApp

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

10 Lead Magnet Ideas to Grow Your Sales Pipeline
The MQL vs. SQL Difference and How Leads Move Through the Sales Funnel
Pre-event Marketing: Boost Event Turnout Through Outreach

Marketing Troubleshooting: What To Do When A Campaign Goes Wrong

Marketing Troubleshooting: What To Do When A Campaign Goes Wrong

Marketing campaigns are not free from problems, and more often than not, we find ourselves in an extremely precarious situation when things turn south. Our answer is marketing troubleshooting.

However, how do we engage in marketing troubleshooting and how can we able to do something about all of this?

In this short guide, we’ll show you how you can check if your campaign is performing well and the first checks that you should do if something does go wrong.

 

Marketing Troubleshooting 101

A downward moving marketing campaign is not the end of the world for your business. It is still an opportunity. How? It is the perfect opportunity to reassess whether or not you are doing something right. If not, then it is a new opportunity to do something you have never done before or try out something you thought would not work. Reality is, you will never really know unless you try.

Consider the following tips in reviving your marketing campaign.

 

#1 Review your marketing strategy.

 It’s a basic practice. When one strategy does not work, look at it again and try to see what went wrong. Did it lack the much-needed information for clients to make an actionable decision? Was the message clear? Did you hit the mark?

When you do a thorough review, you may have the good fortune of not having to overhaul the whole marketing plan. In most cases, all you need to do is make little adjustments here and there until you find the right formula that will attract your target market.

Look at all the aspects of your marketing plan or strategy and put yourself in the shoes of our target client. If you were in their shoes, would you buy the product? Would you be inclined to avail of the service that is being offered? While this may be difficult at some point due to your personal biases towards your product, it is not utterly impossible to do.

To be on the safe side, consider getting a third party perspective on the matter. Consult other members of your team, huddle with a couple of people you trust outside of your company and see what they have to say. And while you’re at it, do it quick!

Related: Enterprise Sales vs SMB Sales: A Side-by-Side Comparison [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

#2 Be more creative.

Most of our marketing problems do not spring from a lack of money, but rather from a lack of ideas. Quite often, the best marketing approaches come from the purest realizations in life. You can get inspiration everywhere! All you have to do is pause and make time to observe the way people around you respond to specific stimuli.

When you discover the unique ways that people respond to specific motivations, think about how to bring it a little further. Beyond the stimulus is the need for people to act -buy your product! But before you can make a sale, you should have caught their attention already. And you can only do this with a very creative approach.

Related: 7 Social Media Ideas to Steal from Classic B2B March Madness Campaigns

 

#3 Get rid of the “Think out of the box” approach.

We have heard it time and time again that we should “think out of the box?” But why think within the bounds of a box at all? This digital age requires that we think as if there is no box at all! Your product or service is only as good as you perceive or package them to be. Avoid restricting your business by thinking, “this cannot be done” or “this is quite impossible to do.” At the end of the day, what will spell the difference between you and your competitor is how daring you are to carry out your vision.

Related: How Are Digital Strategies Evolving With The Integration Of New Technologies Into The Marketing World?

 

#4 Meet customer needs.

If your marketing campaign is taking a downward trend, ask yourself, “Does it meet the need of my customers?” You also have to come to a realization that marketing your product mostly goes beyond meeting a single need. You will be surprised to know that marketing is mostly also about making a need. When things are not going well for you, you need to find a way to create an artificial curve.

Simply put, find a way for your customers to feel a need for your product.

Related: Lead Generation: Utilizing AI to Create Personalized Customer Journey

 

#5 Be relevant.

 An effective marketing strategy is relevant. It means, your product or service is positioned in such a way that it is applicable, timely and appropriate. Being relevant relates heavily to meeting a need. What may have been a need before, may not necessarily be the same at present. As a business operator, it is essential to discover what is relevant to your customers continuously. When you do this, it just might create the artificial curve you need to get back on track.

 

As you can see, engaging in marketing troubleshooting does not have to be so hard if you think about it. There are plenty of things that you can do to sort things out!

 

Build your digital presence, attract the right audience, and engage potential customers with the help of Callbox’s integrated Digital Marketing Solutions.

 

Author Bio:

Rebecca Matias

Rebecca Matias is a Business Development Manager at Callbox. She is a proactive marketer who is willing to share her passion, leadership principles and craft in marketing. Follow Rebecca on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

 

Do you want more leads?

Dial 888.810.7464 | WhatsApp +65 8232 2417

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

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Selling Software and Services: A Short Guide to SaaS Marketing

Selling Software and Services: A Short Guide to SaaS Marketing

Consumers are changing, and this has never been true than in the SaaS industry. Thanks to the Internet which has made all types of information accessible with just a click. The Internet has also allowed buyers to connect with their peers faster; thus, they can get other people’s opinions about a product or service before they buy.

However, this is not the only change that is happening in the SaaS buying process. There are other areas that you need to understand to effectively reach out to your buyers and ultimately close a deal.

 

Paying Attention to Details: The SaaS Buying Experience


The SaaS landscape is changing, and there are four prevalent factors that SaaS vendors need to focus on if they want to capture the attention of their potential customers effectively:

#1 The buyer makes the purchase decision without vendor engagement.

In the past, buyers interact with vendors when they want to know more about the product. With social media, however, people get more connected, and the modern buyer doesn’t need to go straight to the vendor to ask about the products and services they offer. Instead, they ask their fellow consumers and ask for an honest review – talk about glorified word-of-mouth advertising.

Related: The B2B Buying Process Has Changed: Here’s How Not to Get Left Behind

#2 Vendors with recognizable brands still gain the upper hand.

Whether you like it or not, consumers will still choose the familiar brand over something unfamiliar unless they see something of unique value. A well-thought brand strategy will help put your brand on the map.

Start with your core values – what do your brand and your company stand for? Next, how do you want to present your brand to your consumers? Do you want to be quirky or you want to be the voice of luxury?

#3 If you can’t present your product in a few sentences, forget about it.

If you are an unfamiliar brand, you can gain the upper hand by providing consumers an easy-to-use trial because who wants a hundred and one operation guideline? Stop using jargons and technical words that only you or a chosen few can understand. Start using the language your target audience is using, then you have a fighting chance. So you have a choice if you want to gain some market share – be popular or make consumers’ lives much easier.

Related: How to Make a Compelling Presentation For Your Software Product

#4 There’s not only one decision maker.

Decision makers are not the only ones involved in the buying process these days. In fact, they only get in the picture at the end when a final decision has to be made. It shows that there are other people who are given the responsibility to check different products and services. While they might not be the major decision-makers, these people have the power to influence decisions because they are the ones who give the input to the decision makers.

Related: Savvy Ways to Identify and Qualify B2B Decision Makers

 

Strategy for the SaaS Buyer


Seeing how the SaaS buyer experience has changed, it calls for an overhaul of what is familiarly used in how we present our products and services to buyers. It’s not about changing the selling strategy but the product itself. This time, however, you are also designing the product with sales in mind. Here are some factors to consider so you can engage SaaS enterprises more:

Single sign-on

As mentioned above, SaaS consumers want products or services to be uncomplicated. It will do you good if you can design products that only require a single sign-on because it reduces administration efforts.

Login audits

A lot of documents are passed on to different people and departments that organizations sometimes do not know who has access to which document. Creating a feature that shows who accessed a document and what time they accessed it makes it much easier to trace any errors or mistakes that might have occurred.

Limited credentials

 Aside from login audits, features that give users different levels of access to certain documents and software are recommended. This protects any sensitive information in case some credentials got lost or phished.

Multi-level security

Cybercriminals are busy trying to wreak havoc to any system that has low-security levels. Your product or service will be more appealing to consumers if you have addressed different security concerns and implemented some solutions to those problems.

Related: Industry Insights: The 5 Types of Buyers You Meet in Cloud Selling

In Conclusion

While there is no panacea to making the perfect SaaS solution to different types of buyers, an excellent marketer knows how their target customers think, what kind of information they have access to and what interactions they have. Doing this can increase your conversion and your revenue as well.

 

Explore how Callbox’s multi-channel approach helped a Healthcare SaaS vendor gain a 2-fold expansion in qualified appointments.

Healthcare SaaS Vendor’s Pipeline Growth Jumps 2-Fold in 3-Pronged Campaign

 

Author Bio:

Judy Caroll

Judy Caroll is a marketing executive at Callbox. She is a blogger, online marketer and loves to share with you the best stuff in sales and marketing. Follow Judy on Twitter and Google+.

 

 

Do you want to increase your sales? Learn how we generate qualified SaaS leads and appointments for you!

Dial 888.810.7464 | WhatsApp +65 8232 2417

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

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Sales Productivity: Tips From the Top Salespeople

Sales Productivity: Tips From the Top Salespeople

Do you ever feel like it’s a dog eats dog world in sales? Well, it is. Every member of a sales team is looking after his best interests and monthly quota. With a mentality of autonomy, it’s ironic that we still have so much time to look into other people’s sales, compare, and criticize.

If you are determined to make it to the top, you have to stop harboring selfish motives against other salespeople.

Instead, put all your time, energy, and efforts into creating your success. Today you learn how you can become a top salesman.

 

Tip #1 You Have to Think Like a Top Salesman

In “The Greatest Salesman in the World,” Og Mandino prompts us to change the way we think about sales. You can’t expect different results from doing the same things. Albert Einstein calls that insanity. Here are some takeaways from his book you can apply to transform your mind and sales strategy:

Act Now- Don’t wait for another salesperson to reach your customer. You are the right man/woman for the job. An opportunity to sell can strike at any moment, and you have to be ready.

Don’t be Afraid to Set Your Goals High- As Og Mandino said, “The height of my goals will not hold me in awe, though I may often stumble before they are reached.”

Related: Telemarketing Mistakes That Expert Salespeople Still Make

 

Tip #2 You Have to Be in the Right Place

When W. Clement Stone was a newsboy, he sold newspapers in restaurants where people did more reading than on the street. He rose to become one of the world’s best insurance salesman selling insurance to employees in downtown offices.

When planning appointments, a practical approach is systematic. Map out your prospects and go through your appointments by area.

Related: Be a SMART Marketer, Know the Best Time to Call your Prospects

 

Tip # 3 You Have to Be the Expert

In sales, you have to know a little bit of everything, and everything about what you are selling. Top salespeople invest time digging into more than just the facts. They are genuinely interested in the product.

You have to believe your product will solve problems. In a sense, you have to be an expert at problem-solving.

Your product may not always be the solution to their impending problems, but if you can help them resolve their problems with a bit of research or connect them with someone who can help, they may have more time to listen to you talk about how your product can solve another one of their problems.

Related: The 3 C’s of Selling to the C-Suite and Closing Large Deals [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

Tip #4 Get Out There and Sell

Joe Girard learned at a young age that more doorbells rang equals more money made. He later rose to fame as the greatest car salesman in the postwar era. At one point, he sold 18 cars in one day.

Ask yourself, “what is stopping you from putting yourself front and center in the market?” Do you spend more time in the office than face-to-face with your customers? The reason can be one of three things:

  • You have not learned to delegate.
  • You are not prepared.
  • Your system and processes are not automated.

 

Tip #5 Get Some Help

If you don’t delegate, you will get into the time-sucking habit of multi-tasking. Research proves it’s better to focus on one thing than waste 20-40% of your time doing everything at once.

Joe Girard sold thousands of cars because he hired an assistant to research and pre-qualify customers before he talked to them. His assistant also had his appointments lined up for him.

His time was spent on customers who were ready to say YES, reducing time and effort he could have spent decoding a lead you may not be ready to buy.

Related: Capture More B2B Sales Leads with Multi-Channel Marketing

 

Tip #6 Get Organized

Docurated published data that reveals salespeople are wasting more time on unproductive and repetitive tasks than actual selling. If you are still manually updating your client profiles, it’s time to switch to systems that allow you to automate CRM. This way you can access information about your clients at a touch of a button.

Related: Not Just an Address Book: 4 Hacks to Turn a CRM into a True Sales Tool

 

Tip #7 Master the Sales Process

John H. Patterson, the founder of the National Cash Register Company and father of modern sales training, has mastered the art of selling. He designed sales scripts along with a 4-stage sales process—initial approach, proposition, product demo, closing the deal.

Top salespeople do so well because they have a systematic sales process. Low-performing salespeople, on the other hand, are yet to find a sales process that works. While it is important to offer a personalized approach to every customer, each sale should be streamlined to follow an organized sales process to keep the momentum going.

Related: Stages of a B2B Sales Pipeline (and Ways to Increase Your Sales Success Rate)

 

Tip #8 Preparation is Key

The Father of Advertising, David Ogilvy rose to fame as a top salesman of AGA cookers. His company believed in him so much they asked him to write a manual on his sales approach.

If you read the “Theory and Practice of the AGA Cooker,” you will notice that the man with every kind of attack and defense towards his product. Even to the point that he studies the sales arguments of his competitors, but don’t waste time criticizing them in front of his customers.

Related: 4 Fathers Who Shaped the Evolution of B2B Marketing

 

Tip #9 Plan and Prioritize

Tom Hopkins, author of “Selling for Dummies” notes the importance of planning in productivity. 5 minutes is all it takes at the end of every day to identify 5-6 priorities for the next day. This way, you can start your days with more clarity.

At the end of every week, evaluate your performance and plan for the coming week. Calculate the numbers. How many YES, how many NO, how much time did it take to complete the sales process every time, how many calls did you make vs. your target, and so on. You may opt to use a productivity software to better monitor your game.

 

Tip #10 Sleep and Wake Up More Enthusiastic

The number one reason why Ron Popeil can sell absolutely any product on infomercials is his child-like enthusiasm for each product. Now you can’t be Ron Popeil if you’re tired and grumpy.

Even the richest businessmen in the world know this. Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, and Elon Musk sleep 6-7 hours a night to stay productive. They wake up early too. No wonder the saying goes, “the early bird catches the worm”—and chirping happily too.

 

Author Bio:

Rebecca Matias

Rebecca Matias is a Business Development Manager at Callbox. She is a proactive marketer who is willing to share her passion, leadership principles and craft in marketing. Follow Rebecca on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

 

Do you want more leads?

Dial 888.810.7464 | WhatsApp +65 8232 2417

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

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How to Sell to Match the 3 Types of IT Decision Makers

How to Sell to Match the 3 Types of IT Decision Makers

When you are in the IT B2B arena, chances are you will deal with different types of decision-makers in different levels of management. These people can be the IT Managers, CIOs, CTOs, VPs, or CEOs.

If you are lucky enough (pun intended), you might find yourself like a bouncing ball as one decision maker tells you to go to another decision maker. In fact, you might be making the same pitch in front of different high-ranking people in the same company.

Doing the same thing over and over again gets easier in time, but the real challenge is convincing different decision makers with different values to buy your product or services.

Before you map out a strategy, get to know the different types of IT Decision Makers and how to deal with them:

 

The Usual Target

When thinking of decision makers, top-level executives come to mind. After all, C-suite executives get the final word in the buying decision. However, they have a lesser role in the buying process than you may expect. If you focus your marketing efforts solely on them, the effectiveness of your approach is limited because:

  • C-Suite executives are smaller in number.
  • It is expensive and time-consuming to reach them.
  • They are busy people and will most likely delegate your marketing to their IT team for analysis.

What You Can Do

The best approach is to contact only one C-Suite executive. This person has access to other decision-makers and greatly influences the buying decision. It is the C-Suite executive who will gain or lose the most by deciding for or against your sales opportunity.

However, you have to gain their trust first. You can’t sell to these organizations if you’re a stranger to them and their world. It includes understanding the industry they are in, their business goals, the people that will be affected by their buying decision, and the factors that can influence their buying decisions at the last minute.

Establish yourself as a credible advisor with integrity first. You need to have the solutions they have been trying to develop, and the C-Suite executive can see that the organization will benefit from the experience.

Related: The 3 C’s of Selling to the C-Suite and Closing Large Deals [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

The Do-it-all

Small IT business owners are IT buyers, but they don’t have the time it takes to review your proposal for consideration. They most likely have a small team that lacks experience in the strategies you are a master at.

You may have the solution to the problems or challenges they face, but they are unwilling to spend time learning about your organization.

What You Can Do

If you talk about future ROI and a long-term plan, you may not get their attention quickly.  Small IT business owners are focused on their problems now. If you can provide them with solutions for instant relief, then you can win more of their time.

Like C-Suite executives, you need to prove you understand their business and the pain points they are experiencing now. Skip the sales talk because not one of the three IT decision makers is influenced by selling to them.

Instead, focus on building a deeper relationship. Educate your target audience, and you can position yourself as the go-to advisor for solving their pain points and achieving their desire.

Make it as pain-free as possible for them to adopt your solutions. This means providing constant support throughout the process. You need to help them understand what they bought, how they can reap the most benefits from your products and services, and how to add features along the way.

Related: IT Consulting Leads: Finding New Business for Your Tech Consulting Firm

 

The Know-It-All

Do you know what happens to your marketing proposal after you submit it to an organization? Most of the time, it will get passed on to an IT team along with a bunch of other proposals from your competitors. B2B marketers often bypass them, but they are the ones who are most heavily involved in the buying process.

Most of the efforts of studying your organization and your proposal will be handed over to the IT pros. If you can’t convince them that your solution is what they need, the Business Decision Maker won’t even get to see it.

The IT pro’s job is to recommend the best solution to the Business Decision Maker. This will immensely affect the final purchasing decision.

What You Can Do

There are two ways to get to them. One, influence those above them and two be smarter than them (or at least as knowledgeable). The first technique requires working with a deep tech PR expert to publish content that will directly influence his higher-ups.

If you can get his boss to look into your organization and give his thoughts, you must be prepared with highly-visible solutions. This brings us to the second point which is knowledge of their industry and business goals.

You need to show them how you can add value to their company. It includes understanding their needs and pain points more than the solution you have. Doing this will help you make the solution personalized, a gesture they will greatly appreciate because you clearly took the time to find out about their problems and needs.

Conveying what you know about their problems without any mention of sales will earn you their respect.  Don’t overtly sell something and don’t offer them your biased point-of-view towards a single solution.

Related: Utilize a Data-Driven Approach to Generate Technology Leads

 

Closing the Deal

Build trust and position yourself an asset to the whole organization. Your knowledge of their industry, their pains, desires, and your assurance of guidance and support throughout the process will earn their trust. Do your research and consider all the influential factors in the buying process.

Move towards earning their respect, trust, and cultivating a relationship. Position yourself as a knowledgeable problem-solver rather than an annoying salesman. As Zig Ziglar puts it, “You can have everything you want in life, if you will just help other people get what they want.”

Related: How to Skillfully Recognize and Respond to True Buying Signals

 

Speaking of IT selling, Callbox provides tailored IT marketing solutions that can help put your IT solutions in front of people that drive IT buying decisions. Talk to us now!

 

Author Bio:

Judy Caroll

Judy Caroll is a marketing executive at Callbox. She is a blogger, online marketer and loves to share with you the best stuff in sales and marketing. Follow Judy on Twitter and Google+.

 

 

Do you want more leads?

Dial 888.810.7464 | WhatsApp +65 8232 2417

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

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The 3 C’s of Selling to the C-Suite and Closing Large Deals [INFOGRAPHIC]

The C-suite remains a key audience for B2B sales, despite the massive shifts in the business buying landscape we’re experiencing lately. Around 64% of C-level executives (versus 24% of non-C-suite employees) act as the final decision maker in B2B purchases. In situations where CXOs don’t directly make the buying decision, they still wield a huge influence over a large portion of the purchase process.

But the average executive’s role has also changed alongside how CXOs deal with marketers and salespeople. To effectively reach and engage today’s C-suite decision makers, B2B companies need to rethink their approach at selling to this crucial segment.

In an instructive HBR article titled “Salespeople Need a Strategy for Selling to CEOs”, Frank Cespedes, Jay Galeota, and Michael Wong offer up some actionable insights to help B2B sellers face the challenge of connecting and communicating with today’s CXOs. We put together a quick infographic based on these ideas and backed them up with current stats and practical tips from various other sources.

 

The 3 C’s of Selling to the C-Suite and Closing Large Deals [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

According to the above HBR entry, the C-suite has undergone a significant transformation in the past two decades. One key trend is that the number of executives in charge of integrating different business units and functions hasn’t been able to keep up with the C-suite’s rapid evolution.

While the ranks of CXOs reporting to CEOs have doubled, only 35% of Fortune 500 and S&P 500 companies employ a COO responsible for bridging different business areas in the organization together.

The lack of in-depth cross-functional perspectives at the top means that it can be challenging for both internal executives and outside sellers to align different stakeholders and departments toward a common action, such as a purchase decision.

That’s on top of the numerous disruptions that add to the complexity and uncertainty C-level executives face. A survey by Forbes Insights and KPMG finds that 69% of global CXOs are worried about the increasing number of mission-critical issues completely new to them.

It’s in this backdrop that C-level decision makers look for concrete ways to help their organizations meet these challenges head-on. That’s why, when CXOs deal with sales reps from vendors and providers, they’re not just looking for solutions, they also want business insights.

The HBR article talks about building a C-suite selling strategy based on three key points: context, content, and contact.

 

Context

Getting CXOs’ attention is all about framing your sales message in a way that fits the overall business picture. Your executive sales pitch needs to go beyond product details, pain points, or business benefits. It should also be set in the right context. To make sure your pitch fits the big picture, you have to keep the following things in mind:

  • Don’t just ask what keeps CXOs up at night; find out what gets them up in the morning.
  • Executives think of specific business outcomes, not intermediate steps.
  • CXOs worry about how decisions affect the entire business, not just a single area or department.

Related: Savvy Ways to Identify and Qualify B2B Decision Makers

 

Content

The C-suite’s content preferences depend to a large degree on the time they have available for consuming the material. Compelling sales content supports and demonstrates the claims you’re making so that the executive can make an informed decision. Here’s how you enable your content to appeal the to a C-suite audience:

  • Carry out three levels of research: industry-level, company-specific, and executive-focused.
  • Speak the language of the C-suite and talk to CXOs like a peer.
  • Tie all your materials to specific business recommendations and options.

Related: Content Intelligence: Leveraging Data and AI to Create Smarter Content

 

Contact

When connecting with today’s C-level prospects, gatekeepers form the least-pressing issue to worry about. There are far more challenging obstacles you need to clear first to make it into the C-suite:

  • CXOs consult at least 5 different pieces of content before reaching out to a vendor.
  • 73% of executives prefer to work with sales reps referred by someone they know.
  • C-level decision makers want reps who can get their team behind the solution.

Related: How to Reach C-Level Decision Makers and Boost B2B Sales

 

Conclusion:  Selling to the C-suite continues to become even more challenging as CXOs themselves face greater complexity and uncertainty. But with the 3 C’s (context, content, and contact), pitching the C-suite becomes more manageable and consistent.

 

Callbox can help you put the 3 C’s into action with innovative outbound prospecting strategies tailored for C-level audiences.

 

Author Bio:

Rebecca Matias

Rebecca Matias is a Business Development Manager at Callbox. She is a proactive marketer who is willing to share her passion, leadership principles and craft in marketing. Follow Rebecca on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

 

Let’s get you started selling more.

Tell us about the executives you want to reach, and we’ll see how we can help.

Dial 888.810.7464 | WhatsApp +65 8232 2417

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

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A Guide to Planning Your Marketing Campaigns for Q3 (and Q4)

A Guide to Planning Your Marketing Campaigns for Q3 (and Q4)

The third quarter of the year or simply Q3 is probably the most fun – it’s summer. It is also peppered with holidays and other significant events, such as Wimbledon and Independence Day. It’s also the wedding season! Just thinking of them makes you think of fun and vacation as well.

Aside from the fun, Q3 is also a great time to generate big revenues. As a marketer, you just don’t want to let it pass. Look at the statistics:

  • Wimbledon is broadcasted in 200 territories with an estimated 1 billion viewership and 24.1 million stream request
  • The National Retail Federation predicted that 214 million people will celebrate the 4th of July, and will spend around $6.8 billion.
  • Couples spend around $30,000 on average for their wedding
  • The summer spending of an average American household is $1,978
  • The average child’s back-to-school expenses are $688

These are just some of the facts and figures, but you can already imagine the money spent during this period. So how can you incorporate a marketing strategy that will boost your sales in Q3?

Here are a few ideas as you plan your marketing strategy for Q3:

 

Create exclusive sales for that particular event or holiday

You can offer this exclusive sale to your newsletter or email subscribers. Not only will you nurture your current customers but it is also an excellent opportunity to grow your list. Another strategy is to make the sale exclusive for a specified period before you make it accessible to all your customer base. You can also use this to ramp up your lead generation by telling your customers that they can get exclusive access to fantastic deals if they subscribe.

Weeks before the event or holiday starts, start updating your opt-in forms and modify the offer based on the coming event. For example, “Subscribe now and get 50% off any school supplies.”

Exclusive deals, such as these, make your customers feel important as if they’re part of an elite group. It boosts their self-esteem. Just take a look at how Apple uses this strategy every time they’re launching a new product.

Related: Use the Psychology of Free Stuff to Generate Leads

 

Create a sense of urgency

Remember looking for available flights for your next vacation, and there’s this note, “Hurry! Only 2 seats left! 5 people are looking at it right now.”

What did you do? You hurriedly clicked it and paid because you’re afraid somebody will get it ahead of you.

Psychologists say that creating a sense of urgency spurs people to action and takes them out of feelings of procrastination. This is a great strategy to encourage your customers to purchase your products because no one wants to pass a great offer.

One strategy to create that sense of urgency is to place a countdown timer to your landing or product page. It will remind them and develop a sense of urgency as they see that time is running out.

Related: 5 Types of Interactive Content and How They Can Boost Your Engagement

 

Let your social media channel sport the event/holiday theme

Facebook has this feature where you can use themes so you can let others know you are celebrating the event. In the same way, you can also do this to your other social media profile, so you stay relevant with “the times.” You don’t need to make significant changes. Instead, you can update your profile or post messages relevant to the event.

You can also search Twitter for trending hashtags that are relevant to the event. And if it will boost your online presence, engage with the community by joining their conversation.

You can also appeal to their good graces by encouraging them to get involved in a charitable cause. When you are able to get them to do that, chances are you will be able to convince them to purchase your product. The psychological explanation to this is you can make people comply to a large request once they agree to a smaller request first.

Related: 7 Social Media Ideas to Steal from Classic B2B March Madness Campaigns

 

Be creative

Wimbledon, back-to-school, weddings, 4th of July, and other holidays – these are the times people spend the most because they want to enjoy the event and get into the spirit. In other words, they are ready to let those cash go. However, this does not guarantee high returns; therefore, you need to be creative when planning your marketing campaigns.

Some ideas include:

  • Holiday/event guide – Suggest what the best products are or tell your customers what’s the best gift for a wedding or the perfect shirt while enjoying a Wimbledon match, even if it’s just in the comforts of their own living room.
  • Free shipping – Nothing is more attractive than the word ‘free.’ If you are selling services or software, a free one-month trial or download will do wonders in attracting your customers.
  • Personalized combo – Personalized offers are part of customer nurturing plus the discounts are irresistible.

Related: Happy Independence Day! Now Break Free from the Content Marketing Trap

 

When thinking about running a campaign, we can help increase brand awareness as well as bring new leads and customers to your ‘door.’ Chat with us to understand how we can be part of your marketing strategy.

 

Author Bio:

Rebecca Matias

Rebecca Matias is a Business Development Manager at Callbox. She is a proactive marketer who is willing to share her passion, leadership principles and craft in marketing. Follow Rebecca on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

 

Do you want more leads?

Dial 888.810.7464 | WhatsApp +65 8232 2417

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

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Enterprise Sales vs SMB Sales: A Side-by-Side Comparison [INFOGRAPHIC]

 
In Sales 101, we learned that selling to SMBs vastly differs from enterprise sales. SMBs aren’t just scaled-down versions of their enterprise counterparts, in the same way, that large companies aren’t simply full-blown versions of small businesses. These are two very different creatures, each with its own unique characteristics, separate needs, and (consequently) distinct sales philosophies.

In today’s infographic (and in the rest of this blog post), we’ll compare selling to SMBs vs. selling to enterprise customers and find out how the two approaches contrast with each other in terms of pain points, business objectives, buying process, decision makers, messaging, and ideal tactics.

 

Enterprise Sales vs SMB Sales: A Side-by-Side Comparison [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

To make sure we’re on the same page, let’s first pin down what SMB and enterprise customers exactly are. Gartner defines SMBs in terms of employee size and annual sales as follows:

  • Employee size

    Small business: fewer than 100 employees; Mid-sized companies: 100 to 999 employees

  • Annual revenue

    Small business: less than $50 million; Mid-sized: between $50 million and $1 billion

So, for the purposes of this blog entry and infographic, we’ll consider any business that falls outside the above ranges as an enterprise.

With that out of the way, here’s a rundown of key differences when selling to SMB and enterprise customers:

 

Pain Points

SMB and enterprise customers face vastly different business challenges. For example, a survey of 1,000 U.S. and European SMBs reveals that two of the biggest pain points they experience are growing toward stability/profitability (47%) and increasing productivity through workflow improvement (47%).

Meanwhile, for large enterprises, common pain points tend to revolve around specific business areas such as prolonged sales cycles, unintegrated distribution channels, poor return on IT investments, shrinking margins, inadequate reporting, and accountability, etc.

 

Priorities

Business priorities hugely vary between SMBs and enterprise companies. SMBs tend to focus on near-term results since they’re usually looking at shorter time horizons. That’s why, in addition to ROI, SMBs also consider a project’s or solution’s time-to-value (TTV), which is the time elapsed between decision to deployment.

Enterprise customers, on the other hand, typically have the time and resources needed to carry out longer-term initiatives that impact their strategic position (market share, recurrent revenue, etc.). They evaluate how your solution’s benefits support this overall direction.

 

Buying Journey

SMBs arrive at a buying decision much quicker and more directly than their enterprise counterparts. While it can vary widely from one industry to another, SMBs typically complete a purchase within 2 to 90 days from initial contact.

By comparison, enterprise companies follow a longer and less linear path to purchase, with well-defined steps and identifiable buying stages, which can span anywhere between a couple of months to several years.

Related: Stages of a B2B Sales Pipeline (and Ways to Increase Your Sales Success Rate)

 

Decision Makers

In small businesses, purchase decisions are often made by only one person. In fact, CEOs make 98% of all tech buying decisions in SMBs, although some key steps in the buying process are delegated to others in the company.

In contrast, it takes an average of 6.8 stakeholders to arrive at a buying consensus in enterprise companies. Each stakeholder represents a specific business area or department with his/her own interest and expertise in the solution being evaluated.

Related: Savvy Ways to Identify and Qualify B2B Decision Makers

 

Messaging/Content

When evaluating a purchase, SMBs do their research in a way that’s similar to consumers. For example, at least half of SMB buyers choose top brands and the vast majority of SMB decision makers rely on Internet searches and review/recommendation websites. SMBs also want vendors to clearly explain how their solutions translate into business value.

Enterprise customers use multiple pieces of in-depth content during the purchase process. Around half of enterprise decision makers involved in the buying cycle consult between 2 to 5 content materials, including whitepapers, case studies, webinars, blog articles, etc., to evaluate a solution.

Related: What Personalization Means to Your B2B Customers and How to Implement It

 

Sales Tactics

Tactics which are effective at reaching out and engaging SMB customers include a combination of inbound and outbound channels. Paid and organic search closely match how SMB decision makers seek information and thus are effective channels, especially when combined with the scale of email marketing and the personalization offered by targeted one-on-one calls.

Similar inbound and outbound channels apply when selling to enterprise customers. But the tactics need to lean toward nurturing enterprise sales opportunities through multiple touches with a rich content portfolio.

Related: Account-based Marketing: Why It Delivers the Highest ROI

 

Conclusion:

There’s more to the SMB vs. enterprise comparison than just sheer size alone. That’s why selling to either segment isn’t as simple as scaling down or scaling up your sales strategy. Both require a hugely different approach.

Speaking of sales approach, Callbox’s flexible multi-touch, multi-channel marketing strategy helps businesses reach and engage their target buyers (SMB or enterprise customers) in key B2B industries. Learn how you can leverage our award-winning marketing solutions for improved sales performance.

 

Author Bio:

Rebecca Matias

Rebecca Matias is a Business Development Manager at Callbox. She is a proactive marketer who is willing to share her passion, leadership principles and craft in marketing. Follow Rebecca on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

 

 

Do you want more leads?

Dial 888.810.7464 | WhatsApp +65 8232 2417

 

 

Grab a copy of our FREE EBOOK, Targeted B2B Marketing: Guide, Checklists, and Worksheets! A comprehensive guide to targeted marketing to help organizations get in front of the right people at the right time through the right channels with the right message to influence a purchase.

Download Targeted B2B Marketing Guide, Checklists and Worksheets [Free eBook] CTA

Enterprise Sales vs SMB Sales: A Side-by-Side Comparison
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